Category: Community

Attend a Portfolio Review: US Event Roundup

Behance Portfolio Review Week is approaching, and hundreds of events around the world are already being organized and discussed! It’s not too late to host an event in your area or RSVP to attend. To learn more about Behance Portfolio Reviews please visit be.net/reviews.

Check out some US-based events:

New York

When: Monday, November 5, 2012, 7:00 PM
Where: Big Spaceshhip, Brooklyn, NY

RSVP here

Chicago

When: Tuesday, October 30, 2012, 6:00 PM
Where: Next Door 659 W Diversey Pkwy, Chicago, IL 60614

RSVP here

Portland

When: Wednesday, October 10, 2012, 6:00 PM
Where: Hovercraft Studio 822 SE 13th Ave, Portland, OR 97214

RSVP here

Washington, DC

When: Monday, October 29, 2012, 5:00 PM
Where: 303 Interculteral Center, Washington, DC 20057

RSVP here

 

San Diego

When: Friday, November 2, 2012, 7:00 PM
Where: EFM Agency 624 Broadway #502 San Diego, CA

RSVP here

Seattle

When: Monday, October 29, 2012, 5:00 PM
Where: Creature, 1517 12th Avenue #101 Seattle, WA

RSVP here

Many more cities are hosting in the US and around the world! Look for an event near you at Meetup.com/BehanceReviews

Behind the Project: Giving Life to Mysterious Objects

Today we’ll go behind the scenes with creative team  “Bonsoir Paris,” who will walk us through a few of their uber popular projects to learn more about how these astounding creative projects were created.

What’s your daily routine like?
In general, we don’t have a very specific routine. Our way of working is very spontaneous, organic and changing. This philosophy allows us to remain as flexible as possible and to adapt to our clients & to fulfill their needs in the best possible ways. Still, there are some reoccurring aspects in our projects: we always work in collaboration with others, we deal with the production from far or we directly take part in it. We always have an overview of the different steps of the project.

For each project we work hand-in-hand, discussing every aspects of the project together. We start in general with a large vocabulary research so that we can define our project with words first off. The communication is very important, because we always involve specialists from outside the studio  - and we want to get across exactly what we’re going for. We always communicate a lot with sketches and we make detailed drawings and technical drawings when necessary. In our production process, we try to keep a kind of hand-made personality and when it comes to the brands, we always look for the very best result to answer their demands.

Substance


The set-design we created for the project Substance came from a creative urge: we wanted to give life to an hybrid material with mysterious properties, playing with optical and physical effects.

We started out from a basic white piece of foam. Its shape and volume varied according to the models’ position and expression. We took charge of the artistic direction by creating the small sceneries and later on we took care of the production phase. For this series we dived into the contemporary minimalism movement, with a special interest for Anish Kapoor and Carl Andre’s works.

Read more →

Portfolio Review Week: Twitter Buzz

Behance Portfolio Review Week is approaching, and hundreds of events around the world are already being organized and discussed! It’s not too late to host an event in your area or RSVP to attend. To learn more about Behance Portfolio Reviews please visit be.net/reviews.

Check out some of our favorite twitter highlights so far:


Behind the Project: Intricate Wood Carvings

Today we’ll go behind the scenes with creative team  “Bonsoir Paris,” who will walk us through a few of their uber popular projects to learn more about how these astounding creative projects were created. Next week, we’ll be back with a few more of their projects! 

Tell us a bit about your team and the work you’re doing.
Bonsoir Paris’ team is composed of 2 creatives: Rémy Clémente et Morgan Maccari. We’ve been working together for the past 8 years. We started 3 years ago with the idea of building up a cross-over and brand oriented studio, mixing various skills and knowledges. Today, each project requires to work in team with 5 to 6 persons with complementary expertise. So, we’re able to work on the artistic direction, the design, the graphic design and the web design for each project. We are ambitious creatives; when one skill is highlighted, the aim to fulfill the needs of the brands we are working with.

1) Duramen Series –  Handmade Wooden Sculptures


“We decided to make the whole sculpture by hand to be able to obtain the delicacy we were looking for.”
 


Duramen was our first self-produced exhibition project. The objective was to break with the typical creative agencies’ exhibitions, which are often too moderate. It’s disappointing that designers don’t often step out of the frame but rather stay in safe territories. We founded Bonsoir Paris to be able to free ourselves from this working conception. For us, each project should be a new experience, a new technique.

We didn’t want the exhibition to be a show-case of our skills. We wanted it to be a true creative experience highlighting an unusual way of thinking, free from any business strategy. This will for stepping out of the frame drove us towards the design of our Duramen series. We designed the sculptures while having in mind the works of Dali and Magritte during the surrealist period but also with the influence of Arte Povera, which represents for us the hottest point of the minimalist movement.

In order to obtain a very high quality result, we gathered a team of specialists from diverse domains: sculptors, cabinet-makers and designers. We decided to make the whole sculpture by hand to be able to obtain the delicacy we were looking for. We could never reach this level of details using machines. Because of this specificity we worked with 10 persons, 16 hours a day during 2 months and a half.

The pieces were then presented in a larger context; for the opening of a new concept place in Paris called “Le Purgatoire”, which mixes contemporary art and food design. We were also responsible for the artistic direction of this new place and for the creation of their website.

2) Anologic - Fashion Editorial For AMUSEMENT MAGAZINE N°12

Read more →

Behind the Project: The Man Behind Barnes & Noble’s Signature Portraits

In this series, we’ll look deeper into some of the projects on Behance.net that were especially admired in our community. This time, we spoke with Mark Summers, a prominent scratchboard artist whose impressive client list includes Time, Rolling Stone, Sports Illustrated, and even the US Government’s Federal Reserve Bank. You’ll recognize his portraits from these clients, and of course, from Barnes & Noble branding around the world. Learn more about his craft and his project, “Author, Author:”

What was the inspiration behind this project?
The inspiration for this project stems from the fact that I have been doing these portraits for Barnes & Noble for many years. I’ve noticed that there are sometimes questions in chat rooms asking “Does anyone know who does those portraits for Barnes and Noble?”, so I thought I’d give them an answer. It also coincided with the fact that the Art Director on the project, Peter Farago, had assembled all of the portraits onto a website.  The ones I’ve included on Behance are just some of them.  There are dozens more of these. Peter would just call me up and say “Hey, we need a Walt Whitman portrait this week” and I’d just produce it.

Can you describe your process in creating this project?
I work in scratchboard so, all of these portraits started off as a square of black.  I use an X-acto knife to scratch the white lines into the black, giving it an engraved look.  There have been questions sent to me about if I have used “plug ins” and “filters” etc. and I have no idea what they are talking about.  These are all hand drawn with zero use of computer. The original drawings are surprisingly small.  If you look at the head of the Marcel Proust, that’s about 2 and a half inches high.  The same goes for most of them.

Did anything interesting happen as a result of the success of this project?
I have had some wonderful feedback because of this project.  Other illustrators asking questions and a few requests from art directors around the world looking to use some of the images for book covers.

Do you feel that this project is “done” or is there anything you’d like to improve or change int he future?
I do feel this project is done.  It represents a certain stage in my career and this project is one way of putting a period at the end of it. Read more →

Behind the Project: Visualizing Motion in Air

In this series, we’ll look deeper into some of the projects on Behance.net that were especially admired in our community. This time, we spoke with Mike Campau, a Digital Artist & Creative Director in Michigan. He’s done everything from create compelling Celebrity Portraits to intense CGi work (like in “The Future Of Sports”) – but this time, we talked to him about his visualizations of dancers’ movements in “Motion in Air.

What was your inspiration for this project?
I just had an idea of capturing people in mid-air, but wasn’t quite sure in what scenario I would do this. So, I started my usual process of image searching, browsing stock sites and going through my own catalog of images, when I stumbled upon some very nice studio shots of dancers leaping. That was it, I had my subject matter. I tried to envision the motion that the dancer made before and after that moment in air and thought, “how could I visually create that as an object?”. From this point, I now had my inspiration moving forward.

Can you describe your process in creating this project?
Now that I had my subject matter, I started to scour through stock photo sites looking for as many dancers in mid air as possible. Once I did this, I narrowed it down to ones whose lighting style would fit in with what I was envisioning. Having some knowledge of dance from my daughters taking studio lessons and performances, I had a pretty good understanding of the types of movements the different styles the dancers create while performing. From here I had to visually create a sculpture in 3d that best represented these movements. There was some trial and error, along with completely starting over in some cases until I got the right feel and shape.

Did you expect it to be as popular as it’s been on The Behance Network?
Yes, and no. I knew I had created something that I was very proud of and had an instant appeal once I was done, but I had no idea so many people would gravitate to these images and fall in love with them the way I did.

Did you go through many versions and iterations before coming up with these final pieces?
Yes, some of the images took more variations than others, while a couple of them I nailed on the first try – and probably the most popular one (blue cover image) was one of those that just worked instantly.

Did anything interesting happen as a result of the success of this project?  (fans contacting you, job opportunities, blogs picking it up, etc).
Yes, I received a ton of great responses and posts from this series and I was also contacted by a few clients to use the images for magazine covers and an annual report.  It also helped me indirectly, leading some potential clients to my other work and website, which in turn generated other work.

Do you feel that this project is “done,” or is there anything you’d like to improve on or change in the future?
For me, no project is ever “done” but this one is pretty close. There isn’t too much I would change or do differently, other than some small tweaks here and there. As far as the series is concern, I am not sure if I will go back to it to add more or just leave it as a series and move on to my next concept? Read more →