Category: Community

Behind the Project: Water Wigs!

In this series, we’ll look deeper into some of the projects on Behance.net that were especially admired in our community. This time, we spoke with Tim Tadder, a photographer and visual communicator in Los Angeles. His epic Water Wigs project got a staggering 740,000 views, was featured on Reddit, and practically became a meme in the 2 months since it’s been posted. We must admit, we’ve been dying to know how these were accomplished – Tadder divulges his inspiration and process below. 

What was your inspiration for this project?
I had seen the show Time Warp (a slow-motion piece showing a water balloon hitting face) – and thought we could do a similar thing with photography. I wanted to do it with portraits – as you will see from Time Warp, they’re throwing water at a face, which was something I really didn’t want to do.  Also, I had seen a project on Behance where someone had thrown a balloon at a person’s face, and it didn’t have the jump I was looking for.

I wanted to create a still face amidst this explosion of energy. We then began exploring the idea with a mannequin in our studio, and found that when we threw the balloons straight down, it created a hair-like effect. We then figured bald men would make the perfect subjects to really show the effect of the water and the wig/hat like shapes really created an arresting comical image.

Can you describe your process in creating this project?
This is pretty intense, and I do not recommend it to people that are not experienced working with water and electricity! We had to use lots of power to freeze the water, and there was quite a bit of mess. I’d rather skip the details and just say I learned about how to do it online from people shooting exploding balloons, I then modified it to shoot people. It just expanded the scale and the size of the mess.

Did you expect it to be as popular as it’s been on Behance?
Not at all. We have been doing lots of personal projects this year to expand our offering and break out of a style we are know for. We did the future sports project, the Fish Heads, a boxing project, (some others that were epic fails) and then this project. Each one seemed to be better than the previous execution. I think with this one its really something totally different.

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Attend a Portfolio Review: US Event Roundup

Behance Portfolio Review Week is approaching, and hundreds of events around the world are already being organized and discussed! It’s not too late to host an event in your area or RSVP to attend. To learn more about Behance Portfolio Reviews please visit be.net/reviews.

Check out some US-based events:

New York

When: Monday, November 5, 2012, 7:00 PM
Where: Big Spaceshhip, Brooklyn, NY

RSVP here

Chicago

When: Tuesday, October 30, 2012, 6:00 PM
Where: Next Door 659 W Diversey Pkwy, Chicago, IL 60614

RSVP here

Portland

When: Wednesday, October 10, 2012, 6:00 PM
Where: Hovercraft Studio 822 SE 13th Ave, Portland, OR 97214

RSVP here

Washington, DC

When: Monday, October 29, 2012, 5:00 PM
Where: 303 Interculteral Center, Washington, DC 20057

RSVP here

 

San Diego

When: Friday, November 2, 2012, 7:00 PM
Where: EFM Agency 624 Broadway #502 San Diego, CA

RSVP here

Seattle

When: Monday, October 29, 2012, 5:00 PM
Where: Creature, 1517 12th Avenue #101 Seattle, WA

RSVP here

Many more cities are hosting in the US and around the world! Look for an event near you at Meetup.com/BehanceReviews

Behind the Project: Giving Life to Mysterious Objects

Today we’ll go behind the scenes with creative team  “Bonsoir Paris,” who will walk us through a few of their uber popular projects to learn more about how these astounding creative projects were created.

What’s your daily routine like?
In general, we don’t have a very specific routine. Our way of working is very spontaneous, organic and changing. This philosophy allows us to remain as flexible as possible and to adapt to our clients & to fulfill their needs in the best possible ways. Still, there are some reoccurring aspects in our projects: we always work in collaboration with others, we deal with the production from far or we directly take part in it. We always have an overview of the different steps of the project.

For each project we work hand-in-hand, discussing every aspects of the project together. We start in general with a large vocabulary research so that we can define our project with words first off. The communication is very important, because we always involve specialists from outside the studio  - and we want to get across exactly what we’re going for. We always communicate a lot with sketches and we make detailed drawings and technical drawings when necessary. In our production process, we try to keep a kind of hand-made personality and when it comes to the brands, we always look for the very best result to answer their demands.

Substance


The set-design we created for the project Substance came from a creative urge: we wanted to give life to an hybrid material with mysterious properties, playing with optical and physical effects.

We started out from a basic white piece of foam. Its shape and volume varied according to the models’ position and expression. We took charge of the artistic direction by creating the small sceneries and later on we took care of the production phase. For this series we dived into the contemporary minimalism movement, with a special interest for Anish Kapoor and Carl Andre’s works.

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Portfolio Review Week: Twitter Buzz

Behance Portfolio Review Week is approaching, and hundreds of events around the world are already being organized and discussed! It’s not too late to host an event in your area or RSVP to attend. To learn more about Behance Portfolio Reviews please visit be.net/reviews.

Check out some of our favorite twitter highlights so far:


Behind the Project: Intricate Wood Carvings

Today we’ll go behind the scenes with creative team  “Bonsoir Paris,” who will walk us through a few of their uber popular projects to learn more about how these astounding creative projects were created. Next week, we’ll be back with a few more of their projects! 

Tell us a bit about your team and the work you’re doing.
Bonsoir Paris’ team is composed of 2 creatives: Rémy Clémente et Morgan Maccari. We’ve been working together for the past 8 years. We started 3 years ago with the idea of building up a cross-over and brand oriented studio, mixing various skills and knowledges. Today, each project requires to work in team with 5 to 6 persons with complementary expertise. So, we’re able to work on the artistic direction, the design, the graphic design and the web design for each project. We are ambitious creatives; when one skill is highlighted, the aim to fulfill the needs of the brands we are working with.

1) Duramen Series –  Handmade Wooden Sculptures


“We decided to make the whole sculpture by hand to be able to obtain the delicacy we were looking for.”
 


Duramen was our first self-produced exhibition project. The objective was to break with the typical creative agencies’ exhibitions, which are often too moderate. It’s disappointing that designers don’t often step out of the frame but rather stay in safe territories. We founded Bonsoir Paris to be able to free ourselves from this working conception. For us, each project should be a new experience, a new technique.

We didn’t want the exhibition to be a show-case of our skills. We wanted it to be a true creative experience highlighting an unusual way of thinking, free from any business strategy. This will for stepping out of the frame drove us towards the design of our Duramen series. We designed the sculptures while having in mind the works of Dali and Magritte during the surrealist period but also with the influence of Arte Povera, which represents for us the hottest point of the minimalist movement.

In order to obtain a very high quality result, we gathered a team of specialists from diverse domains: sculptors, cabinet-makers and designers. We decided to make the whole sculpture by hand to be able to obtain the delicacy we were looking for. We could never reach this level of details using machines. Because of this specificity we worked with 10 persons, 16 hours a day during 2 months and a half.

The pieces were then presented in a larger context; for the opening of a new concept place in Paris called “Le Purgatoire”, which mixes contemporary art and food design. We were also responsible for the artistic direction of this new place and for the creation of their website.

2) Anologic - Fashion Editorial For AMUSEMENT MAGAZINE N°12

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Behind the Project: The Man Behind Barnes & Noble’s Signature Portraits

In this series, we’ll look deeper into some of the projects on Behance.net that were especially admired in our community. This time, we spoke with Mark Summers, a prominent scratchboard artist whose impressive client list includes Time, Rolling Stone, Sports Illustrated, and even the US Government’s Federal Reserve Bank. You’ll recognize his portraits from these clients, and of course, from Barnes & Noble branding around the world. Learn more about his craft and his project, “Author, Author:”

What was the inspiration behind this project?
The inspiration for this project stems from the fact that I have been doing these portraits for Barnes & Noble for many years. I’ve noticed that there are sometimes questions in chat rooms asking “Does anyone know who does those portraits for Barnes and Noble?”, so I thought I’d give them an answer. It also coincided with the fact that the Art Director on the project, Peter Farago, had assembled all of the portraits onto a website.  The ones I’ve included on Behance are just some of them.  There are dozens more of these. Peter would just call me up and say “Hey, we need a Walt Whitman portrait this week” and I’d just produce it.

Can you describe your process in creating this project?
I work in scratchboard so, all of these portraits started off as a square of black.  I use an X-acto knife to scratch the white lines into the black, giving it an engraved look.  There have been questions sent to me about if I have used “plug ins” and “filters” etc. and I have no idea what they are talking about.  These are all hand drawn with zero use of computer. The original drawings are surprisingly small.  If you look at the head of the Marcel Proust, that’s about 2 and a half inches high.  The same goes for most of them.

Did anything interesting happen as a result of the success of this project?
I have had some wonderful feedback because of this project.  Other illustrators asking questions and a few requests from art directors around the world looking to use some of the images for book covers.

Do you feel that this project is “done” or is there anything you’d like to improve or change int he future?
I do feel this project is done.  It represents a certain stage in my career and this project is one way of putting a period at the end of it. Read more →