Category: Community

Behind the Project: Infographic Feast

In this series, we’ll look deeper into some of the projects on Behance.net that were especially admired in our community. Ryan MacEachern is a Bristol, UK based design student. His works include a project featured in the curated Branding gallery, as well as an innovative take on the bookmark. We spoke with him about his recent project, “food x design”, an infographic tracing his eating habits over two weeks.

1) What was your inspiration for this project?
I’m currently studying Graphic Design and was an assignment to collect a weeks worth of data on a personal habit and then create an infographic poster.  My biggest inspiration while doing this was a project by Peter Ørntoft called “Information Graphics in Context” that I had seen years ago on Behance. I was astounded by the simple concept and striking visuals and knew I wouldn’t be happy creating a vector based solution if I were to create an infographic myself. So, years later and working on this assignment, it immediately struck me to use actual food to chart my food intake. To my surprise, I couldn’t find any projects online that had used this before.

2) Can you describe your process in creating this project?
I knew I wanted to track my food intake and wanted to create a photographic solution. I briefly explored digital, but it was soon apparent the photographic idea stood out and communicated information more effectively.
I had just started a low carbohydrate diet that was very dull and boring in appearance and considered stopping the diet in order to create a more colorful and varied project. Ultimately, I decided to use the food simply as a visual aid and didn’t directly link it to my actual consumed food.
I’m a capable photographer, but felt overwhelmed by the task ahead of me—I did some test shoots using natural light and the photos needed extensive post-production work. Luckily, a friend was able to help me get ahold of some studio lights and I set them up in my living room. I also spent around £60 on food, which about 2 weeks worth of food on a student’s budget, so I made sure it didn’t go to waste. It was very strange cooking a whole chicken at 3 a.m. just to take photos of it.

3) Did you expect it to be as popular as it’s been on The Behance Network?
Loads of blogs have picked it up and I’m getting a steady flow of followers on Behance, but I really didn’t expect it to get such immediate attention. I thought the work was good and nice to look at, but I wasn’t so sure other people would be able to see how much work went into it I’m really glad people like it, Im surprised at how extensive the behance community is I have had people follow me from all over the world which really is a great feeling.

4) Did you go through many versions and iterations before coming up with these final pieces?
This project has two main components: the visual, which in this case is a graph or pie chart, and typography, which communicates all the data and helps the flow. It was challenging to balance them both. Once I chose a font, my next challenge was to adjust lines and labeling to ensure the project wasn’t too crowded with text.

5) Do you feel that this project is “done,” or is there anything you’d like to improve on or change in the future?
The assignment only lasted two weeks, so I’m not sure I worked out all the kinks in the design. I’d like to return to the project soon and make it more extensive, covering other areas, like weight. I’d also like to work more on the coloring.

#WorkspaceWednesday

From studios to cubicles, creative work can come from anywhere. In this series, we’ll be taking a peek at some Behancers’ workspaces. We asked Twitter followers to send us a picture of their workspace one Wednesday. Here’s a roundup of some of our favorite #WorkspaceWednesday images–click the image below to view!

 

Updated Activity Feed and Notifications

Logging into Behance today, you may have noticed something different.  Our team has worked tirelessly to bring you some awesome new things, particularly an updated Activity Feed free of clutter and  new Bell Notifications.

 

The Activity Feed now shows the goings on of the creatives you follow on Behance–what they’re working on (WIPS), projects they’re publishing, collections they’re creating, and work they’re appreciating–while removing the clutter.  What comes forward is the work from talented creatives.

So, where did those notifications on the right side go?  On the top left, of course!  The new Bell Notifications will show you your new Followers and when you work gains an appreciation, comment, or is added to a collection.

 

 

We’re super excited to see these new changes and hope you all really love them!

A Closer Look with Pavel Emelyanov

We had the opportunity to speak with Pavel Emelyanov, a designer out of St. Petersburg Russia who has created incredible projects inspired by natural materials.

1. How long have you been in design?
My professional experience started in 2010 year, when I joined my first design studio. Before that I worked for 5 years in a printing house, making-up newspapers. At that time I studied software and theory and practiced printing processes. First steps were great years!

2. Do your personal projects differ from your professional work? If yes, how so?
In personal projects, I try experiment with ideas, technologies and graphics…but in general my projects have a similar direction and baseline. As a designer I see more around myself and understand how to add something new in personal works. For clients, I often need to use more proven decisions. Sometimes clients see what I do in personal projects, and say: “Oh! I want like this.” But for me it’s less interesting to make the same thing a second time.

Read more →

Behance member wins an Emmy

Paul McDonnel is a London based designer who specializes in Title Design. His projects include title sequences for ”Any Human Heart“, “Copper“, “Without You“, and “By Any Means“. Most recently, McDonnel won an Emmy Award for Outstanding Main Title Design for his work on the title design of “Da Vinci’s Demons”. We spoke with him about his experiences working on the project, as well as his advice for young designers.


Can you describe your process in creating this project?
It started with a Skype meeting with the creator of the series David S. Goyer. We were invited to pitch against a handful of other title companies. We were given the scripts and I got really into them from the start. I have always idolized Leonardo Da Vinci, and I’ve wanted to be Indiana Jones since I was 4… this program seemed like it was merging the two which was beyond awesome!

David mentioned how much he liked the idea of The Johnny Cash Project, so we used that as inspiration. We created a 5 second test for David and he was really into it; we got the call about 4 days later telling us to get started.

The first step for us was to nail down a narrative and work from there. We then created a rough animatic set to the amazing score written by Bear McCreary. Then we started dropping in some of our 3D objects and footage from the show. We were working at 25fps to get the transitions right but then we dropped it down to 12fps and literally printed out each frame. We then used the print as a base layer and hand sketched over it. We placed one of Leonardo’s sketches on top of that and graded it all in Photoshop before bringing each frame back into After Effects, which was a complete labor of love.

Once it was back in After Effects, we brought the frame rate back up to 25 and cleaned up out transitions. Job done!

Did you go through many versions and iterations before coming up with these final pieces?
Not really. We only pitched two ideas, and once we had the go-ahead there were no major surprises. About halfway through the process we had a re-visit of the initial edit which took a bit of time but went surprisingly smoothly.


“Da Vinci’s Demons was ideal for me because I felt invested from the very beginning. The entire team, from David to Bear, were amazing to work with and I was getting paid to work on a project I would have gladly done in my spare time.”


Read more →

World Humanitarian Day: Human Pictures

In honor of World Humanitarian Day, Behance is supporting the United Nation’s campaign by profiling users who have created projects with a particularly humanitarian focus. This year’s World Humanitarian Day theme asks the question “The World Needs More _________”; brands, organizations, and individuals can then sponsor the words to raise money and awareness.

Human Pictures is a film-specialized design group based in New York. Their projects reflect their commitment to progressive media creation, and  include advertisements for the United Nations, get-out-the-vote initiatives, a campaign for SOME Designs, as well as several other documentary short projects.

The theme for World Humanitarian Day is: The World Needs More _______. In three words or less, what do you think the world needs more of?
The World Needs More Will to Change

What led you to pursue these projects?
Human Pictures was born as a means to push toward a more just world through the use of media as a tool for social transformation. From the get go, Human Pictures has been committed to working exclusively on projects that in some way or another contributed in the struggle for justice and social change. These projects are sometimes based on a direct message of transformation, offer options to consumers that contributed to a more just exchange economy, or challenge and question social paradigms around race, gender and sexuality. The UN Women piece clearly spurred a message against racism within Colombian society, while our work on SOME provided more socially responsible alternatives to consumers. Read more →

Behind the Project: Subjective Guide to Life

In this series, we’ll look deeper into some of the projects on Behance.net that were especially admired in our community. Michael Pharaoh is a New Zealand based graphic Designer. His other projects include a rebranding of Cadbury’s chocolate using 3-D modeling and a brand identity for a hypothetical bicycle club. We spoke with him about his recent project Michael’s Guide to Life, a guidebook based on personal experience and advice, modeled after family health books.

What was your inspiration for this project?
I personally just wanted a way to collect what I thought were important pieces of advice or skills I’ve picked up that have helped me through my life. I’ve always liked the design aesthetic of those big family health guidebooks, so I drew inspiration from that and wanted to create one for life.

Behind the Project: Repair Rather Than Replace

In this series, we’ll look deeper into some of the projects on Behance.net that were especially admired in our community. Katie Tonkovitch is a San Francisco based designer. Her other projects include branding for San Francisco dive bar, The Makeout Room as well as timeline based packaging for those trekking through the Himalayas. We spoke with her about her recent project, Mend.

What was your inspiration for this project?
Most of my projects have an element of sustainability to them. The final form was both inspired and limited by existing within those parameters. I think the creative challenge of
balancing aesthetics and function, of striving for both beauty and reusability, was a lot of what made this project successful.

The limited materials I chose drove the design to a high degree. One of the first things I did was hunt down the reusable containers and recycled papers, and make the decision that I was only going to use black ink. Discovering what typefaces and design elements played nicely within those parameters was a large part of my inspiration. For instance, the choice to use colored thread to color-code the different kits was born out of the fact that I limited myself to a single color of ink.

Can you describe your process in creating this project?
The design brief was the primary challenge. This was a fairly open-ended student project, so I really wanted to have a fully fleshed-out concept before I even began sketching. I wanted to do something in the world of sustainability, and spent considerable time brainstorming about how buying a new collection of stuff could possibly be a sustainable act. It then occurred to me that if that stuff helped you mend what you already had, it would be preventing you from buying things you didn’t need. The driving concept became: Don’t buy more stuff; mend what you have.

Read more →

World Humanitarian Day: Jose Ferreira

In honor of World Humanitarian Day, Behance is supporting the United Nation’s campaign by profiling users who have created projects with a particularly humanitarian focus. This year’s World Humanitarian Day theme asks the question “The World Needs More _________”; brands, organizations, and individuals can then sponsor the words to raise money and awareness.

Jose Ferreira is a photographer based in Portugal, known for fashion and documentary photography. We spoke to him about “Trash Land,” a photojournalism project he completed during a 2011 trip to the only solid waste collection facility in Maputo, the capital of Mozambque. 

 

The theme for World Humanitarian Day is: The World Needs More _______. In three words or less, what do you think the world needs more of?
Union, less corruption, and peace.

Read more →

World Humanitarian Day: Ashok Sinha & The Cartwheel Initiative

In honor of World Humanitarian Day, Behance is supporting the United Nation’s campaign by profiling users who have created projects with a particularly humanitarian focus. This year’s World Humanitarian Day theme asks the question “The World Needs More _________”; brands, organizations, and individuals can then sponsor the words to raise money and awareness.

We spoke with Ashok Sinha, a New York based photographer and founder of The Cartwheel Initiative, a nonprofit organization that uses creative media to empower children in the aftermath of crisis. Sinha began The Cartwheel Initiative after a 2010 visit to Sri Lanka, noticing the stark difference between the pristine tourist beaches and the obvious trauma visible in northern Jaffna. The organization aims to provide workshops to help youth affected by the war harness art therapeutically, while also sharing their experiences with the world. The program conducted four workshops in Northern Sri Lanka in 2011. The Cartwheel Initiative held another round of workshops this year; films produced by participants will be screened at the Children’s Museum of the Arts in New York. We spoke about his project Children of Post-War Sri Lanka.


The theme for World Humanitarian Day is: The World Needs More _______. In three words or less, what do you think the world needs more of?
Cross-Cultural Understanding

Why is it important that The Cartwheel Initiative reaches out to kids using art?
Art is a non-political tool that can be used to spark conversations and help young people build bridges within their communities and across ethnic and social divisions.



“Art is a non-political tool that can be used to spark conversations and help young people build bridges within their communities and across ethnic and social divisions.”


Read more →