Category: Community

Behind the Project: Facebook Redesign

In this series, we’ll look deeper into some of the projects on Behance.net that were especially admired in our community. Fred Nerby designed a Facebook redesign concept that has absolutely exploded on the web – over 300,000 views, 15,000 appreciations and counting! He streamlined the experience, adding responsive panels, splitting the News Feed into two columns, for example. Take a deeper look into how this was created below!

What was your inspiration for this project?
As funny as it may sound, the project was not actually inspired by visuals or UI work created by other platforms, but more so a deeper understanding and a personal interest in user behavior. For a while I’ve been researching Systematic Design and what it actually represents and how it’s best applied in the digital space because it’s changed the making of media in the modern world and also how digital agencies are now working.

Understanding behavior and the psychological success behind a platform such as Facebook is crucial before you get in to the creation or execution of design. People around the world are already connected on a personal level with the platform (or the brand that is Facebook) for many different reasons; main factor is that it’s fulfilling a need in people that wasn’t there a few years ago. If you understand the power of systematic thinking then there are ways of drawing that emotional connection out of people with clever design that will make the experience even more powerful and engaging for the user; and that is where it all started.

Can you describe your process in creating this project?
First off, when dealing with a platform such as Facebook, which is heavily focused on a suite of behaviors you need to get an understanding of how to actually design for that. The process of thinking is very different from how people have worked in the past at more traditional agencies. It’s important to understand that most traditional agencies are coming from a pure narrative space where the idea is to interrupt you to think of a brand you haven’t thought about and connect you through a story. Their greatest challenge in the modern world of media right now is to recognize that you can be creative within “Systematic Design”.

For example, the world is embracing the products and media invented in places such as the Silicon Valley (Apple) and the innovation that has been driving such places forward is NOT the innovation of narrative, it’s the innovation and more importantly the understanding of systems and behavior. And today; that has become a creative discipline! Companies like Apple and Facebook are focusing on creating platforms and it’s a new world where you “invent media to frame behavior”, which in itself means that the production is now creative and your relationship with the “making” is very different. If you want your UI to be successful you need to have a solid understanding of all this before you move on to architecture and design when taking on a platform.

All in all, the setup was thought through before I got into the making of design so the overall process of creating the artwork went fairly smooth with a few minor hick-­‐ ups on the way. Again, you can’t jump straight in to a design of such a project without understanding the user behavior and then try to figure things out as you go along. That will never work!

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The next Portfolio Review Week is here!

It’s that time again – the next Behance Portfolio Review Week is coming up from May 13-20th. Last October, there were over 175 events in 56 countries – over 4,000 creatives attended an event to get feedback on their creative work. This is your chance to get personalized feedback on your creative work from the Behance community! We’re looking for event organizers to step forward and plan a Portfolio Review in your area.

More info here:
Behance Portfolio Review Week: http://be.net/reviews
Info for Organizers: http://be.net/reviews/info

If you’re interested, please fill out this short form and then get started by following these steps.
(https://behance.wufoo.com/forms/organize-a-behance-portfolio-review)

P.S. Check out the results from the first Portfolio Review Week, back in May 2012, here: Infographic

17-Year Old Offered Internship on-the-spot at Behance Portfolio Review!

Twice a year, Behance hosts “Portfolio Review Week,”  seven days of community-run events that give creatives around the world a chance to present their work and get feedback from their peers. We were psyched to hear this success story from young photographer Cody Min, who presented at an NYC event last year and received an internship offer on the spot!

One day last spring I opened an email from Behance and read an invitation to attend the April 2012 Behance Portfolio Reviews. I was excited to go, but even moreso when I found out I could actually request to present my own work. The organizer, Tom (founder of AIR ) emailed me back later that week, and approved me to be one of the five presenters.

On the night of the event, a lot of other people in the creative field showed up. I chatted with Oriole Poole, Experiential Designer, Richard Borge, an illustrator whose client list includes the NYTimes and Coke, and the team from Bazaart, a hot new fashion iPad app. It felt great to be there as a presenter – especially at age 17! I met some of the most interesting creatives on the planet, learned more about different industries, and also made valuable connections. You could feel the energy in the room.

My presentation went smoothly, and I received fantastic feedback. It was interesting to hear opinions not only from photographers, but also illustrators, art directors, and designers. The highlight of the night was meeting Becky Yee, fashion and commercial photographer. Her work was amazing, and I learned a lot in the brief time talking with her. She was so impressed that I was presenting my work at a young age, that she offered me an internship on the spot. I was floored.

My summer internship with Becky was probably the most I’ve ever learned about photography. By the end of the summer, I knew how to set up and collapse a studio, navigate the subways while loaded with 70+ pounds of gear, and how to organize clients. I learned how to light and shoot everything from lookbooks to ballet dancers, and everything in-between (including designer picnic baskets). Coincidentally, one of the most memorable shoots was with Bazaart, the startup team I met at the Portfolio Review. They had also met Becky at the event, and were as hooked on her work as I was.

Behance made this incredible connection with Becky possible, but going to the review also inspired me to keep creating and presenting my work. Behance has become an integral part of my creative process, and I’m excited to participate in future Portfolio Reviews.

Cody Min is a photographer and filmmaker. His client list includes Google, ING Group, The Foundation for Economic Education, and various politicians. You can view his work on his website: www.codymin.com and Behance: http://www.behance.net/codymin Give him a friendly shoutout on Twitter: twitter.com/codysogunmin

 

ProSite Beginners Guide

ProSite is a personal portfolio site builder that syncs with Behance. ProSite takes the projects that you’ve already created for your Behance portfolio and turns them into a customizable portfolio website.

New to website building? Apprehensive to dive in and take that first step? This guide is perfect for beginners just getting started with ProSite. Check out how easy it is to build a beautiful and customized portfolio site of your own.

Click on the guide below to see the expanded view!

Behind the Project: Obama Mosaic Illustrations

Of all the art forms that might have you asking – “how’d they do that?” –  mosaic art might be one of the most mysterious. Charis Tsevis, a Greek visual designer, has made a career out of his unique creations – for clients like IKEA, The Wall Street Journal, TIME, and many more. Over the past few years, he’s created a series of immensely popular Barack Obama portraits, contributing illustrations, posters, and graphics to his campaigns in 2008 and 2012. Go behind the scenes and discover the inspiration, and step-by-step process to creating these. 

What was your inspiration for this project?
The inspiration was Barack Obama himself. Obama as the person, the politician, the idea.

Can you describe your process in creating this project?
The main idea behind all my Obama-related works is ‘Unity’. Obama consistently repeats himself with the phrase of “Out of many we are One”. Moreover, the relationship between the whole and its parts creates a fundamental base for all my work.

Once I have found the idea, I collect the various parts that are going to form the whole. I like to carefully select the right elements between many photos and graphics. I spend a lot of time carefully preparing all the small parts. Photographs have to be cropped, corrected and enhanced so they can express the specific meaning I want to emphasize. Typography has to be selected carefully. Verbal and visual content has to be in harmony. After that I select the portraits of Barack Obama that express what I want to say. Although I have bought various photos from different photographers, I still need to work on them. The most important aspect for me in a portrait is light. I want the person to be illuminated in a symbolic way.

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The Benefits of Portfolio Reviews

Graphic design blog You The Designer  featured a great post on the importance and benefits of Portfolio Reviews. Written by photographer and Behance user Gerome Soriano, this post was inspired by his involvement with Behance Portfolio Review Week and recaps some strong points on how valuable feedback can be for the creative community.

Here are some main points he made:
  • Get valuable feedback from people that know what they are talking about because they themselves have been through the same struggles you’re having
  • Step back. Being artists, we have the tendency to be too absorbed in what we do and the works we produce. Portfolio reviews are a good time to separate the work from the artist.
  • Know where you can go. With the feedbacks given by the reviewer and your answers to their questions you will have a better gauge of where your work is heading.
  • Address your dilemmas. Portfolio reviews are also a good time to bring up questions you’ve been struggling to answer.
  • Learn a trick or two. Successful people love recounting how they got their “break” into the industry.
  • Practice communication skills. Most artists, especially new ones, have problems speaking about their artwork. Portfolio reviews are great for practicing, enhancing and evaluating your communication skills.
  • Study how the experts do it. Study how the reviewers communicate. Evaluate their speech, the words and phrases they use.
  • Develop relationships. Portfolio reviews are a great way to gain new friends and business contacts.
  • Opportunities. Portfolio reviews can be a venue where you get “discovered”.
  • Step it up. Portfolio reviews are system shockers.  They reveal your greatest strengths and lowest weaknesses. They state the reality of the market for your work.

Full article HERE