Category: Community

World Humanitarian Day: Human Pictures

In honor of World Humanitarian Day, Behance is supporting the United Nation’s campaign by profiling users who have created projects with a particularly humanitarian focus. This year’s World Humanitarian Day theme asks the question “The World Needs More _________”; brands, organizations, and individuals can then sponsor the words to raise money and awareness.

Human Pictures is a film-specialized design group based in New York. Their projects reflect their commitment to progressive media creation, and  include advertisements for the United Nations, get-out-the-vote initiatives, a campaign for SOME Designs, as well as several other documentary short projects.

The theme for World Humanitarian Day is: The World Needs More _______. In three words or less, what do you think the world needs more of?
The World Needs More Will to Change

What led you to pursue these projects?
Human Pictures was born as a means to push toward a more just world through the use of media as a tool for social transformation. From the get go, Human Pictures has been committed to working exclusively on projects that in some way or another contributed in the struggle for justice and social change. These projects are sometimes based on a direct message of transformation, offer options to consumers that contributed to a more just exchange economy, or challenge and question social paradigms around race, gender and sexuality. The UN Women piece clearly spurred a message against racism within Colombian society, while our work on SOME provided more socially responsible alternatives to consumers. Read more →

Behind the Project: Subjective Guide to Life

In this series, we’ll look deeper into some of the projects on Behance.net that were especially admired in our community. Michael Pharaoh is a New Zealand based graphic Designer. His other projects include a rebranding of Cadbury’s chocolate using 3-D modeling and a brand identity for a hypothetical bicycle club. We spoke with him about his recent project Michael’s Guide to Life, a guidebook based on personal experience and advice, modeled after family health books.

What was your inspiration for this project?
I personally just wanted a way to collect what I thought were important pieces of advice or skills I’ve picked up that have helped me through my life. I’ve always liked the design aesthetic of those big family health guidebooks, so I drew inspiration from that and wanted to create one for life.

Behind the Project: Repair Rather Than Replace

In this series, we’ll look deeper into some of the projects on Behance.net that were especially admired in our community. Katie Tonkovitch is a San Francisco based designer. Her other projects include branding for San Francisco dive bar, The Makeout Room as well as timeline based packaging for those trekking through the Himalayas. We spoke with her about her recent project, Mend.

What was your inspiration for this project?
Most of my projects have an element of sustainability to them. The final form was both inspired and limited by existing within those parameters. I think the creative challenge of
balancing aesthetics and function, of striving for both beauty and reusability, was a lot of what made this project successful.

The limited materials I chose drove the design to a high degree. One of the first things I did was hunt down the reusable containers and recycled papers, and make the decision that I was only going to use black ink. Discovering what typefaces and design elements played nicely within those parameters was a large part of my inspiration. For instance, the choice to use colored thread to color-code the different kits was born out of the fact that I limited myself to a single color of ink.

Can you describe your process in creating this project?
The design brief was the primary challenge. This was a fairly open-ended student project, so I really wanted to have a fully fleshed-out concept before I even began sketching. I wanted to do something in the world of sustainability, and spent considerable time brainstorming about how buying a new collection of stuff could possibly be a sustainable act. It then occurred to me that if that stuff helped you mend what you already had, it would be preventing you from buying things you didn’t need. The driving concept became: Don’t buy more stuff; mend what you have.

Read more →

World Humanitarian Day: Jose Ferreira

In honor of World Humanitarian Day, Behance is supporting the United Nation’s campaign by profiling users who have created projects with a particularly humanitarian focus. This year’s World Humanitarian Day theme asks the question “The World Needs More _________”; brands, organizations, and individuals can then sponsor the words to raise money and awareness.

Jose Ferreira is a photographer based in Portugal, known for fashion and documentary photography. We spoke to him about “Trash Land,” a photojournalism project he completed during a 2011 trip to the only solid waste collection facility in Maputo, the capital of Mozambque. 

 

The theme for World Humanitarian Day is: The World Needs More _______. In three words or less, what do you think the world needs more of?
Union, less corruption, and peace.

Read more →

World Humanitarian Day: Ashok Sinha & The Cartwheel Initiative

In honor of World Humanitarian Day, Behance is supporting the United Nation’s campaign by profiling users who have created projects with a particularly humanitarian focus. This year’s World Humanitarian Day theme asks the question “The World Needs More _________”; brands, organizations, and individuals can then sponsor the words to raise money and awareness.

We spoke with Ashok Sinha, a New York based photographer and founder of The Cartwheel Initiative, a nonprofit organization that uses creative media to empower children in the aftermath of crisis. Sinha began The Cartwheel Initiative after a 2010 visit to Sri Lanka, noticing the stark difference between the pristine tourist beaches and the obvious trauma visible in northern Jaffna. The organization aims to provide workshops to help youth affected by the war harness art therapeutically, while also sharing their experiences with the world. The program conducted four workshops in Northern Sri Lanka in 2011. The Cartwheel Initiative held another round of workshops this year; films produced by participants will be screened at the Children’s Museum of the Arts in New York. We spoke about his project Children of Post-War Sri Lanka.


The theme for World Humanitarian Day is: The World Needs More _______. In three words or less, what do you think the world needs more of?
Cross-Cultural Understanding

Why is it important that The Cartwheel Initiative reaches out to kids using art?
Art is a non-political tool that can be used to spark conversations and help young people build bridges within their communities and across ethnic and social divisions.



“Art is a non-political tool that can be used to spark conversations and help young people build bridges within their communities and across ethnic and social divisions.”


Read more →

Calling all “Makers!”

Robot makers, 3D Printers, lighting designers, toy and gadget makers – if you’re a “maker” of any sort – we invite you to take part in a new initiative on Stackexchange – a Q&A site for the maker community. It seeks to address two major concerns in the world of Makers: knowledge sharing and attribution. This is just the beginning of the creation of a unified and empowered space for Makers.

Join the Beta:

  1.  Go to the StackExchange maker community proposal.
  2.  If you have an account on Stack Overflow, or any other Stack Exchange site, you should be logged in automatically, but if you aren’t, be sure to click “log in” at the top of the page, so you don’t create a second account.
  3. If you don’t have an existing Stack Exchange account, (or do, and have logged in), click the “Commit” button to the left of the description
  4. Fill out the fields in the commit box that pops up.  Be sure to use an email you can access; you’ll need to be able to open a confirmation email.
  5. Once you commit, you’ll be given a link you can use to invite other experts – feel free to share with anyone you think can contribute to the community.
  6. Important: Go to your email and click the confirmation link.

A Closer Look with Akos Major

We had the pleasure of interviewing Akos Major, a freelance graphic designer and photographer whose peaceful photographs and simplistic techniques have caught our eye. 


How long have you been a photographer?
I bought my first camera in 2008, which was a Nikon D40x. I still have some of my first images in my portfolio – the Island series, and a few ones from the waterscapes series. I’m getting into photography more and more each day. It’s a discovery period, i’m trying new mediums and finding new subjects.

Describe your process when creating your ProSite
It was really easy thanks to the developers and the user friendly interface. I’m not good at coding, so it was a huge help. Sure, I want to improve the appearance of the whole site, just have to make a room for it besides the daily tasks – especially in the ‘about’ section. Overall, all I knew is that I wanted a clear looking site and i’m glad with the results.

Read more →

Behind the Project: Explosive Emotions

In this series, we’ll look deeper into some of the projects on Behance.net that were especially admired in our community. Coming Soon is a Belgian based design and branding studio. Their other projects include chalk-drawing branding for  Jameson Whiskey as well as an exploration of what goes into producing a 3-D Comic. We spoke with them about her recent project, Emotion Series, a collection of expressive portraits for a cultural center. 

What was your inspiration for this project?
One of our clients is a cultural center in Belgium and we did a full rebranding for them, from logo to magazine and website. For over 3 years we have been doing the campaign images—the concept is culture with impact . Every year we make a new series of 5 images. This year we wanted to work with pure emotions: emotions people feel when they go to the cultural center during a concert or performance.


“For over 3 years we have been doing the campaign images—the concept is culture with impact . Every year we make a new series of 5 images. This year we wanted to work with pure emotions: emotions people feel when they go to the cultural center during a concert or performance”


Can you describe your process in creating this project?
Since we were working with emotions we had to find nice characters. We did a casting, where we selected 30 people from a group of 200. We shot the photographs over three days. We even picked up people from the street in the end, like they do on street castings.
Read more →

Behind the Project: Dreamy Swim-scapes in time for Summer

In this series, we’ll look deeper into some of the projects on Behance.net that were especially admired in our community. Yuku Shimizu is a New York based illustrator. She has won numerous awards for her work (and was named one of Newsweek Japan’s 100 Japanese People the World Respects). Her other projects include illustrations for the New York Times Book Review as well as a collection of commissioned illustrations repurposed to create “slightly demented children’s stories.” We spoke with her about her recent project, Into the Water, a collection of images focusing on swimming and the water.

What was your inspiration for this project?
This is actually a collection of illustrations I have made over the years for various clients.  Since I got an account on Behance, I’ve been thinking about how to present my work in a different context than on a personal website. What I have started doing lately is to put together different projects under a theme. The weather had gotten warmer in New York, and summer was about to start, so I decided to put together a theme of swimming and underwater.
I make a lot of images that fit this theme; I think it’s because I have severe hydrophobia. I never learned how to swim properly, and going into water deeper than my chest scares the hell out of me. But in my drawings, I can go anywhere. These are sort of my fantasy illustrations. Whenever I can use a water theme, I sneak it in!


 

I never learned how to swim properly, and going into water deeper than my chest scares the hell out of me. But in my drawings, I can go anywhere. These are sort of my fantasy illustrations.

 

 


Can you describe your process in creating this project?
Each project is completely different. They are all published work, so some of the themes were very open ended and let me do whatever I wanted, while others were more art directed. Usually the process of illustrating begins with receiving the story to illustrate. Then, I come up with some concepts and create an ink drawing based on an approved idea, and I finally finish the image with coloring on Photoshop.



Some images and projects do come easier than others, but some come harder than they should be, which can be a struggle. Easy or hard, finishing an image or a project gives me a sense of accomplishment like no other. I guess that’s why we’re artists!


Did you expect it to be as popular as it’s been on The Behance Network?
I am always very excited when a project I’ve posted gets featured; I’ve also received so many encouraging comments to continue producing work. This is a very supportive community, and I really appreciate that.

Did you go through many versions and iterations before coming up with these final pieces?
I do a neurotic number of thumbnails. For me, composition is just as important as the images or the concepts themselves. So, I do plan every little bubble in the picture. Sometimes move them around in the coloring stage till it feels right. Some images and projects do come easier than others, but some come harder than they should be, which can be a struggle. Easy or hard, finishing an image or a project gives me a sense of accomplishment like no other. I guess that’s why we’re artists!

Did anything interesting happen as a result of the success of this project?  (fans contacting you, job opportunities, blogs picking it up, etc).
This got picked up by multiple blogs and sharing sites within a day or two of being posted. I did get more phone calls for jobs since I posted, and some are new clients, but I didn’t ask them where they found me.  I am thankful for that there is an audience for my phobia turned into images. It is very humbling. Thank you.

App Update: Creative Portfolio App now in 9 additional Languages!

The Creative Portfolio App is now fully integrated and functional in 9 additional languages: Spanish, French, Russian, German, Polish, Simplified Chinese, Italian, Portugueses, and Japanese.

We’re very excited to finally be able to recognize the global nature of our community with this update. Even more good news: the app automatically detects the language preferences of your iOS, making it even easier to sync your portfolio, access it offline, as well as customize your portfolio’s display.