Category: Community

A Closer Look with Jessica Henderson

How long have you been in design?
I worked as a full-time designer immediately after I graduated college about 7 years ago. I worked in-house in a University marketing and communications department while going to grad school and switched gears to become an assistant professor after graduating with my MFA about 3 years ago.

Do your personal projects differ from your professional work? If yes, how so?
For sure. I very much have one foot in the “fine art” studio and one in my office. The work I do for clients is strategic, objective-based and bottom-line driven while my studio work is entirely self-directed. I love the freedom to wander here–to not have an explicit strategy or game plan. There’s room for ambiguity, surprise and tension that is typically less desirable in the client-work I do.

A Closer Look with Jessica Henderson

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Most Appreciated Projects: Monthly Roundup

Appreciations are a way to send genuine kudos to another creative professional on Behance. This is our community’s way of curating the network, so that the best projects gain the most exposure. Here’s a look at two of the most appreciated projects on Behance this month:

 Most Appreciated

Maxim Shkret of Krasnador, Russia, re-imagines predators (specifically a bear, fox, and lion) in 3D Vector Graphics. See the full set here (bonus: they’re for sale)!

Most Appreciated

26 letters, 26 materials. FOREAL’s goal was to create a fully sculpted alphabet, using materials ranging from stone and wood to the unexpected (icing, skin, moon, and more)! View The Sculpted Alphabet.

 

 

Behind the Project: Stamps, Post Denmark

In this series, we’ll look deeper into some of the projects on Behance.net that were especially admired in our community. Peter Dam is a Odense, Denmark- based illustrator and designer. “Stamps, Post Denmark” is his first project on Behance.

What was your inspiration for this project?
I was working on another project making a visual portrait of Denmark. When surfing the web for pictures of Denmark, I suddenly spotted—between two pictures of Hans Christian Andersen—a funny picture of a plate with two pieces of danish. I remember thinking “that’s so typical of Danish culture!”

Later that day, I was waiting in line at the post office and saw a new stamp series with a motif of Danish allotments in the sun. That was also so typical of Danish culture!
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Adobe & Sketchfab: A Match Made in 3D Heaven

For the past 24 years, Adobe Photoshop has helped push the creative world forward.  We’ve been able to take what used to be a completely analog act like drawing and digitized it.  Only in our wildest dreams could we imagine having a flat image, analog or digital, come to life.  Now with the advancement and accessibility of 3D printers, almost anyone can go from sketch-to-prototype in minutes.  Now, Photoshop has made this transition even easier with built-in tools that export to services like Sketchfab that allow viewers to completely interact with a 3D model.  Now with a few clicks, you can go from a Photoshop file to a prototype and a Behance project.

 

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For more info on how Sketchfab is helping move the 3D needle forward, be sure to check out their blog update here.

Already up and going with Sketchfab and Behance?  Get posting!

For full info on Adobe Photoshop’s foray into the 3D world, check out this.

The Dare to Share Remix Project

The upcoming Behance Portfolio Review Week is a pretty important one.  This May, we celebrate the fifth installment of PRW and we’re daring our community to share.  Showing and discussing your personal creative work can feel scary, but we feel it’s the key to building an amazing creative community.

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To get the creative juices flowing, we’re daring our community to share their interpretation of our “Dare To Share” sticker.  We’ve been posting these all around, but we want to see what you’ve got.

Using the medium of your choice, incorporate Dare to Share into a Behance project.  Use your imagination and go crazy!  When you’re ready to share, tweet at @behanceteam and add #PRWdaretoshare.  We’ll be searching for those tweets and in the weeks leading up to May 12th, we’ll feature tweets, Facebook posts, and Instagrams of our favorites!

Keep on sharing!

- The Behance Community Team

A Closer Look with Alex Yaeger

We had a great time interviewing Alex Yaeger, a graphic designer and illustrator who focuses on creating original and intriguing concepts to best serve his clients. 

How long have you been in design?
In some ways, since I was a child. My parents were both landscape architects by degree and I was always surrounded by an abundance of drafting tools. I always enjoyed fictional settings in illustrated books and video games that fleshed out their worlds with logos, maps, and schematics. I would often emulate those sorts of creations in my spare time and especially during less-appealing classes in school. At one point, I even designed a logo for a photography studio my mother temporarily worked at. Despite this, I didn’t realize that I wanted to make a career out of my creativity until I was in my second year of college. Having been somewhat aimless and uncertain about my future before, entering the graphic design program really opened my eyes and realized that this was what I was meant to do. Before I left school, I was already tackling freelance and contracted work.

Do your personal projects differ from your professional work? If yes, how so?
I tend to think about each project very passionately. Working professionally, this has caused some deal of anxiety as, in the end: a designer does have to defer final say to a client or director. I have gradually learned to accept this and persevere in fulfilling the duties required of me. I think this is an internal struggle all creatives face when making a living based on their talents, sometimes we care too much for our own good. Personal projects and creative exercises are a good way to prevent burn out and, in the end, tend to appeal to and bring in potential clients the most.

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Success Story: Kim Høltermand

This week we’re featuring a great story from one of our most viewed contributors, Kim Høltermand.

Any of our Behance users who have opened up Prosite for the first time may already be familiar with his sample homepage, but when he decided to join Behance way back in 2007, Kim Høltermand didn’t know what to expect.   He comes from a creative family–his father an artist, his grandfather an architect– but Mr. Høltermand only picked up photography recently as a side project from his rather unusual career as a fingerprints expert in the Crime Scene Unit of The Danish National Police.

 

“Joining Behance changed my life.”

 

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Behind the Project: Life of A Superhero

In this series, we’ll look deeper into some of the projects on Behance.net that were especially admired in our community. Andreas Englund is a Stockholm, Sweden- based artist and art director. “Life of A Superhero” is his first project on Behance.

What was your inspiration for this project?
My visual inspiration originates from my fascination of the human body and Greek sculpture. Conceptually, I get inspired when I’m forced to see things from a new perspective. For me, Greek sculpture is like the main image of the classic Superhero – but without the costume. In general, these superheroes are stereotypes; they are perfect people. In this case wanted to question that stereotype. From there, it wasn’t a huge leap to put a costume on on this old Greek sculpture and then put him in alternative, human situations.

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Can you describe your process in creating this project?
My first motif was “Strawberryjam”– the superhero trying to open a jar of strawberry jam. At first I wanted to paint a new version of the old greek sculpture ”The Discus Thrower”. I wanted to put him in a new context and call him “The Can Opener.” In that process I came up with the idea to put a superhero costume on him– and then the Superhero was born.
The next step actually came one year later when he (the Superhero) was supposed to be beaten up by an older dude in the painting ”Fight”. I had a problem with that motif because it was the older guy who became interesting and I had no story for him. In that process I found out that he could be the older version of the same superhero – still kicking ass. After that painting I had it all figured out, and could continue with this concept of portraying the whole life of a Superhero, uncensored and exposed.

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Did you expect it to be as popular as it’s been on The Behance Network?
I received a lot of positive feedback during this project and I knew a lot of people appreciated this series but I could never imagine it to be this popular. It’s truly a fantastic feeling. I have to thank everybody who has taken time to comment on my project. It means a lot.


“I tried to come up with situations that weren’t obvious and that were not over played. When something is humorous, you want to tone it down rather than enhance it. Otherwise it loses it’s drama and becomes obvious and uninteresting. People are intelligent, and want to be treated that way.”


Did you go through many versions and iterations before coming up with these final pieces?
I guess the number of versions are limitless, and I had a lot of ideas that never made it to the canvas. I tried to come up with situations that weren’t obvious and that were not over played. When something is humorous, you want to tone it down rather than enhance it. Otherwise it loses it’s drama and becomes obvious and uninteresting. People are intelligent, and want to be treated that way.

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Do you feel that this project is “done,” or is there anything you’d like to improve on or change in the future?
The Superhero concept helped me to build my foundation as an artist and now I have lot of other ideas and concepts that I want to explore.
That said, I still have a lot of ideas that I haven’t had time to finish yet about the Superhero… so there will be more stories to tell about this character in the future.

Did anything interesting happen as a result of the success of this project? (fans contacting you, job opportunities, blogs picking it up, etc).
Yes it did! All of the above actually. Since I do have some of my work in Los Angeles, I hope this could lead to new contacts in the US who want’s to exhibit my work. We will see what happens. Either way I’m very satisfied with how things have turned out!

2014 Winter Games on Behance

While it’s not recognized as an official sport (…yet), Creatives on Behance have been busy showing off their best work to commemorate the 2014 Winter Games. Below are snippets from our favorite projects that showcase work from all sorts of places–ad work, editorials, apps, and even industrial design. Click on a photo to take you to the full project!

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SOCHI 2014 Winter games sport illustration for NYT by Francesca D’Ottavi

 

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