Category: Community

Behind the Project: A Different Family Portrait

In this series, we’ll look deeper into some of the projects on Behance.net that were especially admired in our community. Camilla Cantrambone is a Florence based photographer. Her other projects include the cover of “Piazza Italia” magazine, and playful posters and direction for the Little Veg Book. We spoke with her about her recent project “Portraits of my Family,” creative takes on the traditional portrait using beloved objects.

What was your inspiration for this project?
I’ve always been fascinated by objects, and I think every person is represented by their personal objects; the objects they choose and the way they use them tells you a story. When I started doing this project, I felt that the objects belonged to my relatives. They were still full of energy and capable of reminding me of moments I shared with them. In order to recreate specific memories, I started to reorganize these objects. For example, if I look at an image of my grandpa Mario, I can go back to a time when we sat at his writing table and fully feel the mood of that moment. The objects represented in every picture don’t talk about the entire life of my grandpa, but they deeply describe a moment I shared with him.


“The objects represented in every picture don’t talk about the entire life of my grandpa, but they deeply describe a moment I shared with him.”



 Did you expect it to be as popular as it’s been on The Behance Network?

Not at all! Being a personal project I’d never thought to be so popular, but I’m glad I could communicate and share my feelings to people I don’t even know

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Behind the Project: Voting System Behance Reviews

In this series, we’ll look deeper into some of the projects on Behance.net that were especially admired in our community. Pau Alekumsalaam and Dani Llugany are the cofounders of Domestic Data Streamers, a Barcelona based creative labTheir other projects include various forms of data visualization, art installations, sculptures, and even handmade cards. We spoke with them about their project “Voting System Behance Reviews,” a voting system that allowed attendees at their Behance Review to visualize the popularity of projects they voted for. 

1) What was your inspiration for this project?
Following Domestic’s “modus operandi” and working as a creative laboratory, we try to focus on new visualization methods. There was a significant evolution between the first project -where we worked two-dimensionally- and the last one. It was conceptually designed to take place in one of the rooms in the Moritz factory, an old beer factory remodeled under the instructions of Jean Nouvel. You can imagine what a challenge it was for us!

We were interested in translating votes into a piece of work that had a relevant presence in the. Our intention was to generate a dynamic data stream that was reordered and created a tridimensional graphic—which was a literal bar chart.


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A Closer Look with Adam Grason

How long have you been in design?
I’ve been designing since High School and started freelancing around that time but didn’t really take it serious as my career until about 5 years ago. Total years designing has been 10 years.

Do your personal projects differ from your professional work? If yes, how so?
They do tend to be different. I currently work full-time for Disney where my current role requires me to design and illustrate training materials. My freelance/personal work is very stylistically different and tends to be the work I am most passionate about. All my work outside of Disney tends to nod back to the earlier design era where illustration was king and it all had a handcrafted look.

A Closer Look

What do you think are the most important elements to focus on, when creating a personal website?
The most important thing to me is that who you are and the type of work you want to be doing is proudly displayed. In the past I would literally post anything and everything I was working on….even if it sucked. I was so caught up on making it look like I had a lot of work that I started getting the wrong kind of inquires. It wasn’t until I stripped down my site and dropped all the garbage that I began to get the kind of work I could see myself doing for the rest of my life. Your site needs to give someone a snapshot of your passion for art and your skills within seconds or you will lose them.

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Behind the Project: Instagram Redesign Concept

In this series, we’ll look deeper into some of the projects on Behance.net that were especially admired in our community. Aymon Shaltoni is a freelance Art Director and designer specializing in Web and Graphic design. His other projects include numerous brand designs, several mobile apps,  as well as a redesign concept for Google. We spoke with him about his project “Instagram Redesign Concept”

1) What was your inspiration for this project?
Instagram is one of the most distinctive social networks, so my inspiration was initially personally motivated.  I felt like there was a lot to improve in the Instagram design: the app needs new concept with some new features.

2) Can you describe your process in creating this project?
Dealing with social networking requires understanding user. I made a new concept redesign of the application with these new features:

Login interface
New simple design; flat and out of the way.

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A Closer Look with Gabriel Lira

We had the pleasure of interviewing Gabriel Lira, a Brasil based designer who has an incredible eye for branding and a strong entrepreneurial spirit. 

How long have you been in design?
I’ve worked as a designer since 2007, but design has been an important part of my life since I was a kid. I knew from the start that I would use the creative part of my brain to guide me through life. I always liked to draw and when I was a teenager I started drawing rock band’s logos, with inspiration from songs from bands like AC/DC, Black Sabbath and Metallica.

Do your personal projects differ from your professional work? If yes, how so?
Mostly, it doesn’t. The client’s personality is a definitive variable to how the work is going to flow. If the client wants to take risks of developing a cool project, the design process works fine and the result is amazing. The major difference between my personal and professional jobs is the freedom that I have on a project.

What do you think are the most important elements to focus on, when creating a personal website?
There are certain points that have to be taken in consideration, they are: level of experience and the objective of the website. The first one is important to know the level of information in each project and define what content is going to be put in the webpage. On another hand, a experienced professional focused in UX, for example, will have bigger projects in the area and won’t be necessarily showing projects in other areas.

Describe your process when creating this website
The process is very simple and I have been using Design Thinking on all the projects i’ve worked on. Design Thinking can be applied in any area of knowledge. I divide in four steps: Insights, ideas, prototype and realization. Inside each of these steps are applied determined tools that helps me conclude them in a fast and efficient way, however, is not a perfect formula.

What is your daily routine?
Nowadays my routine is simple, I wake up and go to work where I stay during commercial hours. Then I go to the gym and then work on my start up, called Muv Shoes, where I stay until midnight then go back home to rest.

What inspires you and keeps you motivated?
One of the things that helps me keeping motivated is a course on Branding that I have been taking and am now concluding. Behance is another source, I see wonderful works everyday that help me evolve.

What creative project you’ve worked on are you most proud of?
There are two cases that I created that makes me proud, one of them is the brand Janaína Jório and ins a small part of it available in the link: bit.ly/qcBSjp and the other is the one the I work everyday, my start up and cam be followed at www.muvshoes.com.br and soon I will put the whole project in Behance, and everyone will be able to be seen in many curated Galleries.

What are some projects you hope to work on in the future
I hope to work on some projects of big impact in society, relevant projects that have meaning to the rest of the world.

Full ProSite Here.

Behind the Project: Infographic Feast

In this series, we’ll look deeper into some of the projects on Behance.net that were especially admired in our community. Ryan MacEachern is a Bristol, UK based design student. His works include a project featured in the curated Branding gallery, as well as an innovative take on the bookmark. We spoke with him about his recent project, “food x design”, an infographic tracing his eating habits over two weeks.

1) What was your inspiration for this project?
I’m currently studying Graphic Design and was an assignment to collect a weeks worth of data on a personal habit and then create an infographic poster.  My biggest inspiration while doing this was a project by Peter Ørntoft called “Information Graphics in Context” that I had seen years ago on Behance. I was astounded by the simple concept and striking visuals and knew I wouldn’t be happy creating a vector based solution if I were to create an infographic myself. So, years later and working on this assignment, it immediately struck me to use actual food to chart my food intake. To my surprise, I couldn’t find any projects online that had used this before.

2) Can you describe your process in creating this project?
I knew I wanted to track my food intake and wanted to create a photographic solution. I briefly explored digital, but it was soon apparent the photographic idea stood out and communicated information more effectively.
I had just started a low carbohydrate diet that was very dull and boring in appearance and considered stopping the diet in order to create a more colorful and varied project. Ultimately, I decided to use the food simply as a visual aid and didn’t directly link it to my actual consumed food.
I’m a capable photographer, but felt overwhelmed by the task ahead of me—I did some test shoots using natural light and the photos needed extensive post-production work. Luckily, a friend was able to help me get ahold of some studio lights and I set them up in my living room. I also spent around £60 on food, which about 2 weeks worth of food on a student’s budget, so I made sure it didn’t go to waste. It was very strange cooking a whole chicken at 3 a.m. just to take photos of it.

3) Did you expect it to be as popular as it’s been on The Behance Network?
Loads of blogs have picked it up and I’m getting a steady flow of followers on Behance, but I really didn’t expect it to get such immediate attention. I thought the work was good and nice to look at, but I wasn’t so sure other people would be able to see how much work went into it I’m really glad people like it, Im surprised at how extensive the behance community is I have had people follow me from all over the world which really is a great feeling.

4) Did you go through many versions and iterations before coming up with these final pieces?
This project has two main components: the visual, which in this case is a graph or pie chart, and typography, which communicates all the data and helps the flow. It was challenging to balance them both. Once I chose a font, my next challenge was to adjust lines and labeling to ensure the project wasn’t too crowded with text.

5) Do you feel that this project is “done,” or is there anything you’d like to improve on or change in the future?
The assignment only lasted two weeks, so I’m not sure I worked out all the kinks in the design. I’d like to return to the project soon and make it more extensive, covering other areas, like weight. I’d also like to work more on the coloring.

#WorkspaceWednesday

From studios to cubicles, creative work can come from anywhere. In this series, we’ll be taking a peek at some Behancers’ workspaces. We asked Twitter followers to send us a picture of their workspace one Wednesday. Here’s a roundup of some of our favorite #WorkspaceWednesday images–click the image below to view!

 

Updated Activity Feed and Notifications

Logging into Behance today, you may have noticed something different.  Our team has worked tirelessly to bring you some awesome new things, particularly an updated Activity Feed free of clutter and  new Bell Notifications.

 

The Activity Feed now shows the goings on of the creatives you follow on Behance–what they’re working on (WIPS), projects they’re publishing, collections they’re creating, and work they’re appreciating–while removing the clutter.  What comes forward is the work from talented creatives.

So, where did those notifications on the right side go?  On the top left, of course!  The new Bell Notifications will show you your new Followers and when you work gains an appreciation, comment, or is added to a collection.

 

 

We’re super excited to see these new changes and hope you all really love them!

A Closer Look with Pavel Emelyanov

We had the opportunity to speak with Pavel Emelyanov, a designer out of St. Petersburg Russia who has created incredible projects inspired by natural materials.

1. How long have you been in design?
My professional experience started in 2010 year, when I joined my first design studio. Before that I worked for 5 years in a printing house, making-up newspapers. At that time I studied software and theory and practiced printing processes. First steps were great years!

2. Do your personal projects differ from your professional work? If yes, how so?
In personal projects, I try experiment with ideas, technologies and graphics…but in general my projects have a similar direction and baseline. As a designer I see more around myself and understand how to add something new in personal works. For clients, I often need to use more proven decisions. Sometimes clients see what I do in personal projects, and say: “Oh! I want like this.” But for me it’s less interesting to make the same thing a second time.

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