Category: Community

Full Swing: Portfolio Review Week 5 Update

Portfolio Review Week 5 is currently underway and we’ve been seeing tons of Tweets, Instagrams, Blog posts, and other social media blips all week. We’re continually amazed by the excitement around all of the events. Keep posting pictures and recaps of everything you’re doing and keep an eye out for our updates on Pinterest!

Here are some shots from various events around the world!

 

Auckland from anjanaiyer

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Behance Success Story: Amr El Kouedy

We recently got an email from Amr El Kouedy, a user since 2009 who has not only found his dream job, but also an amazing creative community he didn’t even know existed around him.

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“I am a twenty seven year old Egyptian, living my dream in Dubai as successful digital designer at dubizzle.com, one of the biggest classifieds website in the region. As cheesy as it sounds, it is all because of Behance.

I joined Behance in 2009 and uploaded my first project as a junior designer. Using the amazing platform for five years, I grew more and more, learned from the best, and inspired the younger desingners. Yet, I never realized how this platform can impact my life.

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A Closer Look with Jessica Henderson

How long have you been in design?
I worked as a full-time designer immediately after I graduated college about 7 years ago. I worked in-house in a University marketing and communications department while going to grad school and switched gears to become an assistant professor after graduating with my MFA about 3 years ago.

Do your personal projects differ from your professional work? If yes, how so?
For sure. I very much have one foot in the “fine art” studio and one in my office. The work I do for clients is strategic, objective-based and bottom-line driven while my studio work is entirely self-directed. I love the freedom to wander here–to not have an explicit strategy or game plan. There’s room for ambiguity, surprise and tension that is typically less desirable in the client-work I do.

A Closer Look with Jessica Henderson

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Most Appreciated Projects: Monthly Roundup

Appreciations are a way to send genuine kudos to another creative professional on Behance. This is our community’s way of curating the network, so that the best projects gain the most exposure. Here’s a look at two of the most appreciated projects on Behance this month:

 Most Appreciated

Maxim Shkret of Krasnador, Russia, re-imagines predators (specifically a bear, fox, and lion) in 3D Vector Graphics. See the full set here (bonus: they’re for sale)!

Most Appreciated

26 letters, 26 materials. FOREAL’s goal was to create a fully sculpted alphabet, using materials ranging from stone and wood to the unexpected (icing, skin, moon, and more)! View The Sculpted Alphabet.

 

 

Behind the Project: Stamps, Post Denmark

In this series, we’ll look deeper into some of the projects on Behance.net that were especially admired in our community. Peter Dam is a Odense, Denmark- based illustrator and designer. “Stamps, Post Denmark” is his first project on Behance.

What was your inspiration for this project?
I was working on another project making a visual portrait of Denmark. When surfing the web for pictures of Denmark, I suddenly spotted—between two pictures of Hans Christian Andersen—a funny picture of a plate with two pieces of danish. I remember thinking “that’s so typical of Danish culture!”

Later that day, I was waiting in line at the post office and saw a new stamp series with a motif of Danish allotments in the sun. That was also so typical of Danish culture!
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Adobe & Sketchfab: A Match Made in 3D Heaven

For the past 24 years, Adobe Photoshop has helped push the creative world forward.  We’ve been able to take what used to be a completely analog act like drawing and digitized it.  Only in our wildest dreams could we imagine having a flat image, analog or digital, come to life.  Now with the advancement and accessibility of 3D printers, almost anyone can go from sketch-to-prototype in minutes.  Now, Photoshop has made this transition even easier with built-in tools that export to services like Sketchfab that allow viewers to completely interact with a 3D model.  Now with a few clicks, you can go from a Photoshop file to a prototype and a Behance project.

 

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For more info on how Sketchfab is helping move the 3D needle forward, be sure to check out their blog update here.

Already up and going with Sketchfab and Behance?  Get posting!

For full info on Adobe Photoshop’s foray into the 3D world, check out this.

The Dare to Share Remix Project

The upcoming Behance Portfolio Review Week is a pretty important one.  This May, we celebrate the fifth installment of PRW and we’re daring our community to share.  Showing and discussing your personal creative work can feel scary, but we feel it’s the key to building an amazing creative community.

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To get the creative juices flowing, we’re daring our community to share their interpretation of our “Dare To Share” sticker.  We’ve been posting these all around, but we want to see what you’ve got.

Using the medium of your choice, incorporate Dare to Share into a Behance project.  Use your imagination and go crazy!  When you’re ready to share, tweet at @behanceteam and add #PRWdaretoshare.  We’ll be searching for those tweets and in the weeks leading up to May 12th, we’ll feature tweets, Facebook posts, and Instagrams of our favorites!

Keep on sharing!

- The Behance Community Team

A Closer Look with Alex Yaeger

We had a great time interviewing Alex Yaeger, a graphic designer and illustrator who focuses on creating original and intriguing concepts to best serve his clients. 

How long have you been in design?
In some ways, since I was a child. My parents were both landscape architects by degree and I was always surrounded by an abundance of drafting tools. I always enjoyed fictional settings in illustrated books and video games that fleshed out their worlds with logos, maps, and schematics. I would often emulate those sorts of creations in my spare time and especially during less-appealing classes in school. At one point, I even designed a logo for a photography studio my mother temporarily worked at. Despite this, I didn’t realize that I wanted to make a career out of my creativity until I was in my second year of college. Having been somewhat aimless and uncertain about my future before, entering the graphic design program really opened my eyes and realized that this was what I was meant to do. Before I left school, I was already tackling freelance and contracted work.

Do your personal projects differ from your professional work? If yes, how so?
I tend to think about each project very passionately. Working professionally, this has caused some deal of anxiety as, in the end: a designer does have to defer final say to a client or director. I have gradually learned to accept this and persevere in fulfilling the duties required of me. I think this is an internal struggle all creatives face when making a living based on their talents, sometimes we care too much for our own good. Personal projects and creative exercises are a good way to prevent burn out and, in the end, tend to appeal to and bring in potential clients the most.

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