A Closer Look with Gabriel Lira

We had the pleasure of interviewing Gabriel Lira, a Brasil based designer who has an incredible eye for branding and a strong entrepreneurial spirit. 

How long have you been in design?
I’ve worked as a designer since 2007, but design has been an important part of my life since I was a kid. I knew from the start that I would use the creative part of my brain to guide me through life. I always liked to draw and when I was a teenager I started drawing rock band’s logos, with inspiration from songs from bands like AC/DC, Black Sabbath and Metallica.

Do your personal projects differ from your professional work? If yes, how so?
Mostly, it doesn’t. The client’s personality is a definitive variable to how the work is going to flow. If the client wants to take risks of developing a cool project, the design process works fine and the result is amazing. The major difference between my personal and professional jobs is the freedom that I have on a project.

What do you think are the most important elements to focus on, when creating a personal website?
There are certain points that have to be taken in consideration, they are: level of experience and the objective of the website. The first one is important to know the level of information in each project and define what content is going to be put in the webpage. On another hand, a experienced professional focused in UX, for example, will have bigger projects in the area and won’t be necessarily showing projects in other areas.

Describe your process when creating this website
The process is very simple and I have been using Design Thinking on all the projects i’ve worked on. Design Thinking can be applied in any area of knowledge. I divide in four steps: Insights, ideas, prototype and realization. Inside each of these steps are applied determined tools that helps me conclude them in a fast and efficient way, however, is not a perfect formula.

What is your daily routine?
Nowadays my routine is simple, I wake up and go to work where I stay during commercial hours. Then I go to the gym and then work on my start up, called Muv Shoes, where I stay until midnight then go back home to rest.

What inspires you and keeps you motivated?
One of the things that helps me keeping motivated is a course on Branding that I have been taking and am now concluding. Behance is another source, I see wonderful works everyday that help me evolve.

What creative project you’ve worked on are you most proud of?
There are two cases that I created that makes me proud, one of them is the brand Janaína Jório and ins a small part of it available in the link: bit.ly/qcBSjp and the other is the one the I work everyday, my start up and cam be followed at www.muvshoes.com.br and soon I will put the whole project in Behance, and everyone will be able to be seen in many curated Galleries.

What are some projects you hope to work on in the future
I hope to work on some projects of big impact in society, relevant projects that have meaning to the rest of the world.

Full ProSite Here.

Portfolio Review Week: Roundup + Thank You!

As Portfolio Review Week #4 comes to a close, we can’t help but be amazed by the events hosted by Behancers around the world. Portfolio Review Week couldn’t happen without all of you, and we want to take a moment to thank you for all your hard work and creativity organizing, preparing, and executing your Reviews!

We love seeing pictures of all the events you host and attend because they’re proof of the dynamic, creative, and empowered community we work with. You can find pictures of other events by searching the tag #BehanceReviews, as well as on our Flickr and Pinterest pages. Here are a few from this week…

(RED) + Adobe Promote Creative Students & AIDS Awareness

In September Adobe and (RED) joined forces to celebrate emerging creatives with a global talent audition for students. Ramona Ring, an illustration student from Hamburg, Germany was selected as the winner based on her innovative illustration project, and went on to collaborate with legendary graffiti artist Futura on the below album cover for Dance (RED) Save Lives:

Check out the video documenting competition winner Ramona Ring & Futura’s collaboration.

The Dance (RED) Save Lives2 Album is now available on iTunes for pre-order.

(RED) is on a mission – to deliver an AIDS FREE GENERATION. In 30 years, AIDS has taken the lives of 35 million people. There is no cure yet, but there has been incredible progress, and we are at a critical time in the fight. Today, 900 babies are born each day with HIV- that number can be near zero. Every generation is known for something. Let’s be the one to deliver an AIDS FREE GENERATION.

 

Behind the Project: Infographic Feast

In this series, we’ll look deeper into some of the projects on Behance.net that were especially admired in our community. Ryan MacEachern is a Bristol, UK based design student. His works include a project featured in the curated Branding gallery, as well as an innovative take on the bookmark. We spoke with him about his recent project, “food x design”, an infographic tracing his eating habits over two weeks.

1) What was your inspiration for this project?
I’m currently studying Graphic Design and was an assignment to collect a weeks worth of data on a personal habit and then create an infographic poster.  My biggest inspiration while doing this was a project by Peter Ørntoft called “Information Graphics in Context” that I had seen years ago on Behance. I was astounded by the simple concept and striking visuals and knew I wouldn’t be happy creating a vector based solution if I were to create an infographic myself. So, years later and working on this assignment, it immediately struck me to use actual food to chart my food intake. To my surprise, I couldn’t find any projects online that had used this before.

2) Can you describe your process in creating this project?
I knew I wanted to track my food intake and wanted to create a photographic solution. I briefly explored digital, but it was soon apparent the photographic idea stood out and communicated information more effectively.
I had just started a low carbohydrate diet that was very dull and boring in appearance and considered stopping the diet in order to create a more colorful and varied project. Ultimately, I decided to use the food simply as a visual aid and didn’t directly link it to my actual consumed food.
I’m a capable photographer, but felt overwhelmed by the task ahead of me—I did some test shoots using natural light and the photos needed extensive post-production work. Luckily, a friend was able to help me get ahold of some studio lights and I set them up in my living room. I also spent around £60 on food, which about 2 weeks worth of food on a student’s budget, so I made sure it didn’t go to waste. It was very strange cooking a whole chicken at 3 a.m. just to take photos of it.

3) Did you expect it to be as popular as it’s been on The Behance Network?
Loads of blogs have picked it up and I’m getting a steady flow of followers on Behance, but I really didn’t expect it to get such immediate attention. I thought the work was good and nice to look at, but I wasn’t so sure other people would be able to see how much work went into it I’m really glad people like it, Im surprised at how extensive the behance community is I have had people follow me from all over the world which really is a great feeling.

4) Did you go through many versions and iterations before coming up with these final pieces?
This project has two main components: the visual, which in this case is a graph or pie chart, and typography, which communicates all the data and helps the flow. It was challenging to balance them both. Once I chose a font, my next challenge was to adjust lines and labeling to ensure the project wasn’t too crowded with text.

5) Do you feel that this project is “done,” or is there anything you’d like to improve on or change in the future?
The assignment only lasted two weeks, so I’m not sure I worked out all the kinks in the design. I’d like to return to the project soon and make it more extensive, covering other areas, like weight. I’d also like to work more on the coloring.

#WorkspaceWednesday

From studios to cubicles, creative work can come from anywhere. In this series, we’ll be taking a peek at some Behancers’ workspaces. We asked Twitter followers to send us a picture of their workspace one Wednesday. Here’s a roundup of some of our favorite #WorkspaceWednesday images–click the image below to view!