Most Appreciated Projects: Monthly Roundup

Appreciations are a way to send genuine kudos to another creative professional on Behance. This is our community’s way of curating the network, so that the best projects gain the most exposure. Here’s a look at two of the most appreciated projects on Behance this month:


The stair truck returns! A project filled with “Greatest Rides” from film and TV, from Dumb & Dumber to Back To the Future and Beyond. Kudos, Ido Yehimovitz.


Tom Anders Watkins of the UK’s super-popular animal logo exploration. In his words: “exploring ways in which logos can be formed using only basic shapes nd minimalist techniques.”

 

 

June’s #workspacewednesday

For this edition of #workspacewednesday, we wanted to start sharing some photos from our own work spaces here at the Behance office in New York City.  First, some context.

We’re located in Soho, a neighborhood sandwiched between Greenwich Village to the north and Chinatown to the south.  Known as the Soho Cast Iron Historical District, the neighborhood was designated as a National Historic Landmark in 1978 and many of the side streets still sport Belgian block roads and cast iron architectural elements.  During the second half of the 20th century, Soho was home to artist lofts and performance spaces.  In the early 2000s. the area changed drastically thanks to retail outposts from Apple, Bloomingdales and many others and in recent years, Soho has been included in Silicon Alley, New York City’s burgeoning tech scene.

As you might notice, we name our rooms.  This one is Victore, named after our friend James Victore.  The Library was “constructed” when we spread our office out to the floor below us.  Originally, we had some bookcases here and there, but we decided that we needed a space where someone could sit and contemplate or learn something new.  Or take a conference call.  We usually take a lot of conference calls.

IMG_0942

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Developer’s Toolkit: Rachel White

This post is part of a series where Behance developers talk about the various tools they use to get things done and make ideas happen.

75932_10101210392506118_795298238_n1. Who are you and what do you do at Behance? 

I’m Rachel White, and I’m a Software Engineer. I’m on the JavaScript team and I mostly work on refactoring legacy code to be more up-to-date with new standards we’ve set for ourselves. Sometimes I work on CSS projects and prototyping new ideas for the site, too.

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Portfolio Review Week: Recaps!

One of our favorite things about the Portfolio Review process is being able to see pictures of all the amazing events hosted around the world! Behance Reviews host’s never cease to amaze us, and Portfolio Review Week #5 is no exception awesome events on our Flickr and Pinterest pages for proof.

We also wanted to share some of the incredible recap videos some of our reviewers have created to show case their events. These are only some of the amazing event recaps created by our hosts; we’ll be adding more in the coming weeks, so be sure to check back!

Caracas, Venezuela

Toronto, Canada

Mar del plata, Argentina

Brasilia, Brazil

Bucaramaga, Colombia

Naples, Italy

Sao Paolo, Brazil

Popayán,Colombia

Accra, Ghana

Dusseldorf, Germany

Developer’s Toolkit: Mark Dunphy

This post is part of a series where Behance developers talk about the various tools they use to get things done and make ideas happen.

Hello it's Mark!1. Who are you, and what do you do at Behance?

By now you’ve probably already learned my name, so I suppose I won’t go into that. However, I will tell you that I’m a backend software engineer at Behance.  I have the interesting position of floating between teams and products quite frequently, so I get to leave a little Mark (hah, get it?) on everything.  Beyond the sprinkling of love and code I put into other team members’ projects, I’m primarily responsible for Behance emails (notifications, automated digests, switching service providers, you name it) and fighting spam.

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Developer’s Toolkit: Andrew Crerar

This post is part of a series where Behance developers talk about the various tools they use to get things done and make ideas happen.

andrew 1. Who are you, and what do you do at Behance?
I’m Andrew and I’m responsible for the development and day-to-day operation of our Custom Creative Networks. What is a Custom Creative Network (CCN)? I’m glad you asked! CCN’s are essentially streamlined, thinner versions of Behance but differ in that they have the ability to be customized; really cool stuff. On a normal day you can catch me working the full stack: anything from writing SQL, PHP, or JS, to making CSS changes and going to production (Wooo)!
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Developer’s Toolkit: Nina Berg

This post is part of a series where Behance developers talk about the various tools they use to get things done and make ideas happen.

ninaberg1. Who are you and what do you do at Behance?

Hey there, I’m Nina Berg, a Quality Engineer here at Behance. Our team’s job is to ensure Behance is as stable and bug-free as possible. To that end, we work on developing whatever tools, infrastructure, and processes are needed to test our website. My recent projects include working on a Selenium testing library called Paige, and designing a continuous integration workflow for the cookbooks our devops team works on.
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And an amazing week it was!

Events for our fifth Portfolio Review Week are just about wrapping up, and with over 300 events and 3,234 uses of the hashtag #BehanceReviews, we are blown away by how well our online community can come together and collaborate offline. Thank you to all of our hosts and attendees for a truly amazing week and stay tuned for some additional stats! Here are some highlights:

Pinterest Page
#BehanceReviews on Twitter
PRW Flickr 

PRW # 5

 

Developer’s Toolkit: Krasimir Georgiev

This post is part of a series where Behance developers talk about the various tools they use to get things done and make ideas happen.

krasWho are you and what do you do at Behance?

Hi there! My name is Krasimir, software engineer here at Behance. I’m part of the backend team and my main responsibility is to break the site and fix it after that (on my first day here Bryan said I could, so I do it from time to time).

My job is to implement new features and improve the old ones. I work on a better way of storing and retrieving the images on Behance. I was also involved in improving the way invites and requests on the site work. The rest of what I do is still under wraps.

I moved to NYC almost 4 years ago and joined Behance about 1 year ago. It’s great to be a part of something that I’ve known and followed for a long time even when I was back in Bulgaria.
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