Custom PHPUnit Annotations

Here’s a trick that I just implemented on our own testing framework to handle custom annotations. Annotations are comments written in a standard format that are used to declare properties for tests, such as dependencies and grouping. You can read more about the standard PHPUnit annotations here: http://www.phpunit.de/manual/current/en/appendixes.annotations.html

There are only a handful of annotations available natively to the PHPUnit framework. I’ve written some code that allows you to create additional rules you might need, and trigger them with your own custom annotations. You’ll need to instantiate a ReflectionMethod and then parse the doc block for the proper data.

In the sample code provided below, I look for the annotation “@browser” to determine what type of browser to launch (Firefox, Chrome, Internet Explorer, etc.) If the browser is not found, then setUp() does not launch a browser. I create a user through the web app using Selenium, and then test that user with curl requests against our API. The curl requests did not require a Selenium browser, which saved about 10 seconds of setup per test.

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Testing Simplified: Page Objects

Testing is hard. Maintaining tests is even harder.

When we first started using Selenium WebDriver, writing a test meant creating a one-off function that performed the given task, but duplicated a bunch of code, and used hard-coded elements if any HTML/CSS got involved. Trying to get coverage on something as large as the Behance Network (be.net) became bloated and unmaintainable.

Without an easy way to create and improve tests as features changed, QA + testing became the last priority in development.

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