Category: Team

Developer’s Toolkit: Jess Lissy

This post is part of a series where Behance developers talk about the various tools they use to get things done and make ideas happen.

1. Who are you, and what do you do at Behance?

Oh hey! My name is Jessica Nicole Lissy, but most people call me Jess. I’m a professional mouse clicker, code stalker, Apple lover, and style enthusiast. I’m originally from New Jersey, but I spent most of my life in Charleston, South Carolina and Orlando, Florida. I’ve also lived in California, Arizona, and Colorado. I like to surf, wakeboard, snowboard, and sport the latest kicks.

Basically what I do at Behance is CSS the “bleep” out of Behance’s Custom Creative Networks (such as Student Show, among others), and all of our Served sites.
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Developer’s Toolkit: Matt LeBrun

This post is part of a series where Behance developers talk about the various tools they use to get things done and make ideas happen.

1. Who are you, and what do you do at Behance?

Hey everybody! My name is Matt LeBrun and I’m the latest addition to the Dev Team over here at @Behance. I graduated school in 2008 and have been building things for the web ever since. Here at Behance, I’ve gotten my hands dirty in a wide range of projects including the new Art Center Gallery, some Network Javascripting, creating some internal documentation, as well as a distributed logging application. Some current side projects are a personal management tool built off Codeigniter and a mobile app for an invoicing service.

As I define my role here, I think my major role is helping out where another developer is needed. I’m very flexible with my range of skills and can hop on most projects with little explanation. With such a great team and great products, I love bouncing around project to project because it keeps everything fresh for me.

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Developer’s Toolkit: Dan Chan

This post is part of a series where Behance developers talk about the various tools they use to get things done and make ideas happen.

1. Who are you, and what do you do at Behance?

Hey there, Dan Chan here. I am the lead QA engineer at Behance. Last summer, I started off as an intern developing features for our web applications. After graduating from Binghamton University, I became a fulltime employee and am currently spearheading the automated testing effort (with the help of Bryan and the rest of the dev crew.) Did I mention that I’m also the youngest person on the dev team? I’m also the youngest person at Behance, but don’t count me out.
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Developer’s Toolkit: Jackie Balzer

This post is part of a series where Behance developers talk about the various tools they use to get things done and make ideas happen.

1. Who are you, and what do you do at Behance?
Hello Internet! I’m Jackie and I’m Behance’s resident web gradient maker/CSS wizard/semantic HTML evangelist/front-end developer. The short description of my role is that I make things pretty; primarily, I’m the one responsible for taking designs and building the HTML/CSS that you see when you browse our sites. The long description on top of that is being responsible for keeping our HTML and CSS standards compliant, clean, organized and efficient (for example, so that all of our websites and all of your ProSites look good, work correctly and are snappy-quick in every browser) as well as building out entire new features for ProSite, such as cover loading effects and implementing Typekit, among others.
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Developer’s Toolkit: Dave Stein

This post is part of a series where Behance developers talk about the various tools they use to get things done and make ideas happen.

1. Who are you, and what do you do at Behance?
I’m Dave Stein, and I will never get “DaveStein” as a username anywhere, except my own website. I started working here December 26th, 2006, when Scott Belsky and Matias Corea were crazy enough to hire me as the first developer. Fast-forward a few years and I’m the Chief of Development. After Bryan puts in the foundation ( except The 99%, which somehow escaped me ) I code the first specific lines for each application and keep going until product launch. I also took his architecture to make our own framework on the JavaScript side of things. Aside from programming, I attend the meetings about our products to make sure they are always improving.

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Developer’s Toolkit: Dmitry Traytel

This post is part of a series where Behance developers talk about the various tools they use to get things done and make ideas happen.

1. Who are you, and what do you do at Behance?

I’m Dmitry Traytel, and I’m a programmer, part-time DJ, lunch-time sandwich connoisseur and the resident Russian at Behance. I graduated with a Computer Science degree from Binghamton University in 2007 and have been a Senior Developer here at Behance since early 2010. My main role on the team is to build new features and upgrade existing ones on the Behance Network, though I’ve also had a hand in developing portions of the Creative Networks, ProSite and The 99%. Much of my job involves coordinating with the design team to take a feature from its mocked-up design and building it out. That starts with getting the right data in the right way to drive the content, and I work with Chris Henry and the infrastructure that powers Behance to do that correctly. I then write application logic and create the object on the server side, building on top of the solid application framework that Bryan Latten and others have developed and continue to improve. Finally, I write the front-end markup, JavaScript (generally jQuery) and CSS to get everything to look great and run smoothly. This process requires me to have an understanding of our entire framework and best practices. From writing efficient SQL queries, maintainable front and back-end code, and fast, reusable CSS selectors, I generally have a part in each step of a feature, from architecture to production.

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Developer’s Toolkit: Bryan Latten

This post is part of a series where Behance developers talk about the various tools they use to get things done and make ideas happen.

1. Who are you, and what do you do at Behance?

Hey all, I’m Bryan Latten, and I’ve been a part of this team since mid-2008. My role at Behance is the Chief Software Architect. This involves ensuring that our development team can deliver clean, maintainable and scalable code. I have been the primary contributor to our own development framework which includes a system of libraries and tools that tie together best practices. These tools have forced consistency across a wide range of applications. I’ve had my hand in nearly everything Behance has built, or more accurately, rebuilt.
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Developer’s Toolkit: Chris Henry

This post is part of a series where Behance developers talk about the various tools they use to get things done and make ideas happen.

1. Who are you, and what do you do at Behance?

Hello world, I am Chris Henry, team member since March 2007. Over the years I have taken on a lot of roles at Behance, and regularly will wear many hats throughout the average day. From the beginning, I have been the team’s Backend Ranger & MySQL Wrangler, building much of the code and infrastructure that runs the Behance Network Gallery, Served Sites, and Creative Portfolio Display. As the company progressed, I have done work as an Ad Ops J-Ass, Big Red Button Pusher, Janitor, Email Navigator, and Firefighter for my work with the advertising side of the business, operations & build management, waste disposal, email marketing, and crisis management. Read more →

Developer’s Toolkit: Malcolm Jones

This post is part of a series where Behance developers talk about the various tools they use to get things done and make ideas happen.

1. Who are you, and what do you do at Behance?

Hey young world. I’m Malcolm Jones and I’m a Senior Developer over here @ Behance. I originally studied Computer Science at The University of Virginia, had some fun in the startup world while living in Washington, DC, then finally made the big move to NYC to join our awesome team here in SoHo.

On average I end up working on a lot of back-end / infrastructure type projects. In one project I worked on, I took our old image service application ( which handles all of the photo-manipulation actions on The Network and Prosite ) and redesigned it from the ground up making it easier for us to maintain and test using PHPUnit. To deal with our ever increasing traffic, its important that we can add more image servers on the fly to balance out usage between our websites. To make this process easier, I went a step further to automate the creation of new image service cloud servers by using Rightscripts ( courtesy of our cloud computing management platform Rightscale ). These days, adding more servers to our image service pool requires minimal thinking and only takes a couple of minutes!

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