Developer’s Toolkit: Chris Fortier

This post is part of a series where Behance developers talk about the various tools they use to get things done and make ideas happen.

fortier1. Who are you and what do you do at Behance?

Hello, I’m Chris Fortier and I am the Lead Quality Engineer at Behance. My main responsibility is to help guide the Quality Engineering Team so that we can figure out how to test all the various aspects of our websites. I’ve been on the team for a year now (I know, I’ve slacked off on writing this post) and I’ve been involved in quite a few projects. The first major project that I worked on was an automated process to build a replica of our production environments so that we can have a more effective development and testing process. These environments are built on VirtualBox and OpenStack virtual machines. For the past several months I’ve been working very closely with the DevOps team as we adopt Chef and standardize our infrastructure as code. Looking forward to 2014, we are in the process of a complete overhaul of our testing infrastructure and busy trying to figure out how to build a Continuous Deployment process. Stay tuned for details.
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Developer’s Toolkit: Sean Dunn

This post is part of a series where Behance developers talk about the various tools they use to get things done and make ideas happen.

1. Who are you, and what do you do at Behance?

Hi There! I’m Sean Dunn and I spend my days at Behance hacking on Javascript with Dave Stein and Alex Lee. Over the last few months I’ve worked on everything from modularizing our front-end codebase to new feature for our users to internal tools that help us get our job done. My newest obsession is improving how we test our site functionality across multiple browsers and Operating Systems.

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Developer’s Tookit: Manny Toledo

This post is part of a series where Behance developers talk about the various tools they use to get things done and make ideas happen.

1. Who are you and what do you do at Behance?

Hello everybody, I’m Manny Toledo a Devops Engineer here at Behance. My main goal is making sure that Behance always offers the best experience possible to everyone in the community. Beyond that I help implement and build tools to make our lives easier on the development and infrastructure side of Behance. My new shiny toy to accomplish that is Chef.  It is a configuration management tool that lets us use code to describe what our infrastructure should look like and push those rules out to each server.  This also allows us to commit our configuration to git and keep versions of infrastructure changes.  Overall some really awesome stuff for managing a servers in bulk.

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Developer’s Toolkit: Dallas S. Simpson

This post is part of a series where Behance developers talk about the various tools they use to get things done and make ideas happen.

1. Who are you, and what do you do at Behance?

I’m Dallas S. Simpson and I am the Database Administrator (DBA) here at Behance. I’m responsible for all things MySQL related from making sure our databases are online, consistent and running as fast as possible to designing schemas, writing queries and making sure the code is interacting with the databases in the most efficient manner possible. I love databases! I’ve been working in tech for over 13 years now in various capacities and databases have always been the one thing that never cease to interest me. Originally I’m from Philadelphia, PA but moved to the East Village in New York in November of 2012 to come work here at Behance. When I’m not working I can found taking in live music, enjoying small batch bourbon, hanging out with my dog or underwater SCUBA diving.

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Developer’s Toolkit: Ko Uchiyama

This post is part of a series where Behance developers talk about the various tools they use to get things done and make ideas happen.

1. Who are you, and what do you do at Behance?

Hello all, I’m Ko Uchiyama and I am the Head of DevOps over here at Behance.  My main responsibilities are to make sure all of our systems are running smoothly – servers, databases, networks, etc.  I also do lots of automation work with bash scripting and Puppet.  I find it really helpful to automate as many tasks as possible, so that I can spend more time on the more important tasks at hand and being more proactive.
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Developer’s Toolkit: Kevin Ran

This post is part of a series where Behance developers talk about the various tools they use to get things done and make ideas happen.

1. Who are you, and what do you do at Behance?

I’m Kevin and like a few others on the Dev team, SUNY Binghamton is my Alma Mater. Personally, I play guitar, [lots of] video games and animate things once in a while. I’m also an avid C/C++ programmer. Overall, a very simple guy (despite the C/C++ part).

At Behance I’m a full time QA Engineer. It’s been a lot of manual testing of new features, automated testing and maintaining the framework that we use for those tests – our page objects. I focus a lot on enforcing a clear, maintainable pattern in our page objects, not just for ease of use (by me, Dan and potentially other devs), but for extensibility. It’s thrilling because I get the unique opportunity to focus on how efficient my code is and how to utilize and combine language features in nifty ways!
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Developer’s Toolkit: Mike Klein

This post is part of a series where Behance developers talk about the various tools they use to get things done and make ideas happen.

1. Who are you, and what do you do at Behance?

Hey! My name is Mike Klein and I help make ideas happen here at Behance. My role on the team is Backend Developer and spend most of my days dabbling in PHP. Over the last few months I’ve worked on some awesome projects like social signup for Action Method Online, image service restructuring and project editor for the Behance Network. Besides coding, I also enjoy listening to music, collecting instruments and playing guitar.
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Developer’s Toolkit: John Refano

This post is part of a series where Behance developers talk about the various tools they use to get things done and make ideas happen.

1. Who are you, and what do you do at Behance?

My name is John Refano.  I’m a professional contrarian, noise-maker, perfectionist and coffee drinker.  Oh yeah, and I’ve been known to make websites.  I was born in New York, but lived in Philadelphia for the majority of the past 10 years.  I currently live in Brooklyn, and wouldn’t want to live anywhere else.  I also have a degree in Design, strangely enough.

I am a developer at Behance where my focus and interest lies primarily on the front end.  I use Sass, Javascript (thank Resig for jQuery) and PHP to build pretty things (About BehanceAbout Prosite) and style up stuff you just might use every day on the Behance Network.  I built most of the 99% Conference site, and put in a teensy bit of work styling the new Action Method Online.  I also helped on a big restructure of the Sass on our Served sites and CCN‘s with the rest of our awesome front end team (JFTW… our names all start with the letter J), finding ways to make things more efficient in terms of customization and reusability. I try to add cool stuff to our private little Sass framework when I can.  I guess in some capacity, I touch the part you see of everything we build here.

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On-Site FTW!!!1!

Among IT professionals and software developers, the debate over the merits of working on site has raged since the dawn of time. The Behance team has always advocated that being on site is the best way to build up a finely tuned team. Building great products requires constant collaboration, balancing of opinions, and being able to work with the girl with the right set of skills to solve your problem.

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Developer’s Toolkit: Alex Lee

This post is part of a series where Behance developers talk about the various tools they use to get things done and make ideas happen.

1. Who are you and what do you do at Behance?

Greetings all! I’m Alex Lee and I joined the team at Behance to do crazy JavaScript for our various web apps. Before I joined, only Dave Stein was doing the heavy JavaScripting. That at least partially contributes to his creeping madness. Since day 1 of working here, I have been charting the great tumultuous seas of JavaScript, building the new Action Method Online, which I can assure everybody is at least 17 times better than the current one.

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