Developer’s Tookit: Anshu Pande

This post is part of a series where Behance developers talk about the various tools they use to get things done and make ideas happen.

anshu1.) Who are you and what do you do at Behance?
I am Anshu Pande and I am a Security Operations Engineer with Adobe Behance. I work Closely with the Devs/Ops/QE/Asset teams as well as other internal and external Adobe teams keeping track of all the vulnerabilities that the Behance environment has or could be infected with. I am an Amazon AWS Certified Solutions Architect. I follow cloud best-standards to secure our cloud infrastructure. I believe that if we do our basics in a correct way from the start, we will make a very powerful end product that will be easy to use. I have deployed various tools to help detect problems, tools such as Evident IO, Netflix Security Monkey and AWS Trusted Advisor. I also hack/scan internal websites and infrastructure using tools like Qualys/ZAP and I am a certified White Belt and Green Belt security Ninja.

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Developer’s Toolkit: Mike Sherov

This post is part of a series where Behance developers talk about the various tools they use to get things done and make ideas happen.

noname1. Who are you, and what do you do at Behance?
I’m Mike (and that’s one of my twins, Grant, on my shoulders. Julian’s a bit shy!). I’m primarily a JS engineer, but I also dabble in PHP, Mustache, and SCSS. I guess you’d say I’m a full stack dev who just prefers writing JS. I have a strong passion for testing, deployment, and code quality. I maintain (and contribute to) Behance’s static analysis toolchain: SCSSLint, JSHint, JSCS, PHPCS, and am currently working on centralized logging using Sumologic.
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Developer’s Toolkit: Rachel White

This post is part of a series where Behance developers talk about the various tools they use to get things done and make ideas happen.

75932_10101210392506118_795298238_n1. Who are you and what do you do at Behance? 

I’m Rachel White, and I’m a Software Engineer. I’m on the JavaScript team and I mostly work on refactoring legacy code to be more up-to-date with new standards we’ve set for ourselves. Sometimes I work on CSS projects and prototyping new ideas for the site, too.

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Developer’s Toolkit: Mark Dunphy

This post is part of a series where Behance developers talk about the various tools they use to get things done and make ideas happen.

Hello it's Mark!1. Who are you, and what do you do at Behance?

By now you’ve probably already learned my name, so I suppose I won’t go into that. However, I will tell you that I’m a backend software engineer at Behance.  I have the interesting position of floating between teams and products quite frequently, so I get to leave a little Mark (hah, get it?) on everything.  Beyond the sprinkling of love and code I put into other team members’ projects, I’m primarily responsible for Behance emails (notifications, automated digests, switching service providers, you name it) and fighting spam.

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Developer’s Toolkit: Andrew Crerar

This post is part of a series where Behance developers talk about the various tools they use to get things done and make ideas happen.

andrew 1. Who are you, and what do you do at Behance?
I’m Andrew and I’m responsible for the development and day-to-day operation of our Custom Creative Networks. What is a Custom Creative Network (CCN)? I’m glad you asked! CCN’s are essentially streamlined, thinner versions of Behance but differ in that they have the ability to be customized; really cool stuff. On a normal day you can catch me working the full stack: anything from writing SQL, PHP, or JS, to making CSS changes and going to production (Wooo)!
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Developer’s Toolkit: Nina Berg

This post is part of a series where Behance developers talk about the various tools they use to get things done and make ideas happen.

ninaberg1. Who are you and what do you do at Behance?

Hey there, I’m Nina Berg, a Quality Engineer here at Behance. Our team’s job is to ensure Behance is as stable and bug-free as possible. To that end, we work on developing whatever tools, infrastructure, and processes are needed to test our website. My recent projects include working on a Selenium testing library called Paige, and designing a continuous integration workflow for the cookbooks our devops team works on.
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Developer’s Toolkit: Krasimir Georgiev

This post is part of a series where Behance developers talk about the various tools they use to get things done and make ideas happen.

krasWho are you and what do you do at Behance?

Hi there! My name is Krasimir, software engineer here at Behance. I’m part of the backend team and my main responsibility is to break the site and fix it after that (on my first day here Bryan said I could, so I do it from time to time).

My job is to implement new features and improve the old ones. I work on a better way of storing and retrieving the images on Behance. I was also involved in improving the way invites and requests on the site work. The rest of what I do is still under wraps.

I moved to NYC almost 4 years ago and joined Behance about 1 year ago. It’s great to be a part of something that I’ve known and followed for a long time even when I was back in Bulgaria.
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Developer’s Toolkit: Chris Fortier

This post is part of a series where Behance developers talk about the various tools they use to get things done and make ideas happen.

fortier1. Who are you and what do you do at Behance?

Hello, I’m Chris Fortier and I am the Lead Quality Engineer at Behance. My main responsibility is to help guide the Quality Engineering Team so that we can figure out how to test all the various aspects of our websites. I’ve been on the team for a year now (I know, I’ve slacked off on writing this post) and I’ve been involved in quite a few projects. The first major project that I worked on was an automated process to build a replica of our production environments so that we can have a more effective development and testing process. These environments are built on VirtualBox and OpenStack virtual machines. For the past several months I’ve been working very closely with the DevOps team as we adopt Chef and standardize our infrastructure as code. Looking forward to 2014, we are in the process of a complete overhaul of our testing infrastructure and busy trying to figure out how to build a Continuous Deployment process. Stay tuned for details.
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Developer’s Toolkit: Sean Dunn

This post is part of a series where Behance developers talk about the various tools they use to get things done and make ideas happen.

1. Who are you, and what do you do at Behance?

Hi There! I’m Sean Dunn and I spend my days at Behance hacking on Javascript with Dave Stein and Alex Lee. Over the last few months I’ve worked on everything from modularizing our front-end codebase to new feature for our users to internal tools that help us get our job done. My newest obsession is improving how we test our site functionality across multiple browsers and Operating Systems.

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Developer’s Tookit: Manny Toledo

This post is part of a series where Behance developers talk about the various tools they use to get things done and make ideas happen.

1. Who are you and what do you do at Behance?

Hello everybody, I’m Manny Toledo a Devops Engineer here at Behance. My main goal is making sure that Behance always offers the best experience possible to everyone in the community. Beyond that I help implement and build tools to make our lives easier on the development and infrastructure side of Behance. My new shiny toy to accomplish that is Chef.  It is a configuration management tool that lets us use code to describe what our infrastructure should look like and push those rules out to each server.  This also allows us to commit our configuration to git and keep versions of infrastructure changes.  Overall some really awesome stuff for managing a servers in bulk.

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